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Why Would People Send Letters to a Tree?

Sending letters to a tree taps into our innate desire for connection and expression. The famous 'Bridegroom Oak' in Germany, for instance, has become a symbol of hope for those seeking love, as they post letters to its branches. This tradition merges romance with nature's timeless allure. What could a tree teach us about the human heart? Continue with us to uncover the stories hidden in the leaves.

Joyce Kilmer famously wrote that he would "never see a poem as lovely as a tree," but do you think he ever sent one a love letter?

Perhaps if he had known of Germany's Die Bräutigamseiche (the Bridegroom’s Oak), he would have. The 500-year-old oak tree outside Eutin has been a matchmaker for decades, starting in 1890, when a local girl and boy – who eventually married – exchanged secret letters by placing them in a knothole in the tree. In the years since, thousands of people have written letters looking for love and sent them to the tree. Anyone may come and read the letters, and perhaps respond and fall in love.

The tree's popularity is such that in 1927, it was given its own postal code and postman. The tree is reportedly responsible for matching couples for more than 100 marriages.

The amazing tree:

  • Trees are the oldest living organisms on Earth, with some surviving for more than 5,000 years.

  • Trees absorb the bulk of the Earth's carbon dioxide emissions; a single mature tree can absorb nearly 50 pounds (21.7 kg) of carbon dioxide a year.

  • In one day, a large tree can discharge 100 gallons (378 liters) of water into the air after pulling it from the ground.

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    • There is a 500-year-old oak tree in Germany with its own mailing address; it receives hundreds of letters from people looking for love.
      There is a 500-year-old oak tree in Germany with its own mailing address; it receives hundreds of letters from people looking for love.