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What’s Left of the Titanic in 2022?

Over a century underwater, the Titanic's remains are a haunting relic of maritime history. In 2022, rust and deep-sea creatures have claimed much of the wreckage, yet significant portions like the bow still captivate us with their eerie grandeur. Witness the Titanic's current state through striking imagery and consider what secrets the deep ocean still holds. What might we uncover next?
Margaret Lipman
Margaret Lipman
Margaret Lipman
Margaret Lipman

Perhaps it's not surprising that the Titanic isn't in great shape. More than 110 years after the ocean liner collided with an iceberg and sank into the North Atlantic (and 37 years after it was rediscovered), the ship lies at the bottom of the ocean, around 12,500 feet (3,800 m) below sea level, some 370 miles (595 km) away from St. Johns, Newfoundland.

Thanks to research teams and cutting-edge submersibles like OceanGate Expeditions' Titan, we can now see exactly what state the famous ship is in. According to OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush, the shipwreck is in worse condition than it was last year, particularly the forward railing. He noted last year that the ship's mast had already collapsed.

The rusty metal ruins of the Titanic are rapidly being consumed by bacteria and could disappear within decades.
The rusty metal ruins of the Titanic are rapidly being consumed by bacteria and could disappear within decades.

The shipwreck – evidence of a disaster that claimed over 1,500 lives when the luxury liner sank in April 1912 – is being consumed by the ocean and will one day disappear entirely, possibly within several decades. However, the area is far from lifeless. Marine biologists, archaeologists, mapping specialists, and environmental DNA experts will analyze the footage and data collected by OceanGate to learn about the species that have turned the site into a deep-sea habitat.

Touring the Titanic:

  • The Titan submersible, which was designed to withstand the immense pressures at the bottom of the ocean, will survey the Titanic's remains on a yearly basis. It has a laser scanner attached to take precise measurements.

  • In addition to Rush, who piloted the submersible, and OceanGate's research team members, 21 "mission specialists" who each paid $250,000 were able to travel to the shipwreck site across the eight dives this season.

  • Want to see it for yourself? Earlier this week, OceanGate released the first-ever high-definition footage of the Titanic site in 8K. It's available to watch on YouTube.

Margaret Lipman
Margaret Lipman
Margaret Lipman is a teacher and blogger who frequently writes for WiseGEEK about topics related to personal finance, parenting, health, nutrition, and education. Learn more...
Margaret Lipman
Margaret Lipman
Margaret Lipman is a teacher and blogger who frequently writes for WiseGEEK about topics related to personal finance, parenting, health, nutrition, and education. Learn more...

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    • The rusty metal ruins of the Titanic are rapidly being consumed by bacteria and could disappear within decades.
      By: BiblioArchives / LibraryArchives
      The rusty metal ruins of the Titanic are rapidly being consumed by bacteria and could disappear within decades.