How do Quick Divorces Work?

Diana Bocco

With almost 50 percent of Americans marriages ending in divorce every year, quick divorces have become a safer and economical alternative to the more traditional procedures. While they are not for everybody, many couples can benefit from it. For example, partners who have no children under 18 can opt for a quick divorce, as there would be no child support issues to resolve. The same is true of couples who have no financial debts and those who can resolve property division amicably before initiating the divorce proceedings. If both parties agree to terminate the marriage quickly, these kinds of divorces can be arranged and executed in a matter of days.

Quick divorces can be arranged if there are no minor children or financial debts.
Quick divorces can be arranged if there are no minor children or financial debts.

Quick divorces, however, are not recommended in certain cases. Fighting couples that cannot agree on property division or other issues should go through the regular divorce proceeding channels. If one of the parties does not agree to sign papers or cannot be located, a quick divorce would not be possible. If the petitioner has a claim or is expecting something from the other side, then a quick divorce is also not an option.

Those who cannot agree on the terms of the divorce may not be able to file for a quick divorce.
Those who cannot agree on the terms of the divorce may not be able to file for a quick divorce.

Quick divorces basically work the same way than regular ones. A petition for dissolution of marriage must be filed by one of the parties, either personally or through a representative. Once the other party is served, he or she should simply sign the agreement and return it. There is no need to be present in the actual proceedings, and no oral testimony is required. After all paperwork has been signed and filed, there is a waiting period of up to 90 days, in which a judge will agree to dissolve the marriage. Nevada holds the record for quick divorces, with final answers taking as little as a week.

Couples with significant debt will likely be unable to get a quick divorce.
Couples with significant debt will likely be unable to get a quick divorce.

Quick divorces are substantially cheaper than the alternative. For people filing by themselves, the cost is usually under $100 US Dollars (USD), which covers filling fees, stamping, and certifications. Many opt to file through divorce companies, which charge a flat fee of $300-500 USD but can save the petitioner time and aggravation at the courthouse.

A quick divorce can still leave a significant emotional impact.
A quick divorce can still leave a significant emotional impact.
The length of a marriage may dictate how quickly a divorce can occur.
The length of a marriage may dictate how quickly a divorce can occur.
Couples who agree on the division of assets may find a quick divorce useful.
Couples who agree on the division of assets may find a quick divorce useful.
Quick divorces are not recommended in certain cases.
Quick divorces are not recommended in certain cases.
Nearly 50 percent of American marriages end in divorce each year.
Nearly 50 percent of American marriages end in divorce each year.

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Discussion Comments

jenniey86

My husband & I got married in Nov. We're ready to call it quits. We only did it because we had a second unplanned baby on the way. Too late to turn back right? But want to know what we can do; can we do a quick divorce? We live in MA, do they do it here? Plus, we have no assets together. But having children does that play a role?

jerrynice0

I want to get a quick divorce in PA filing myself.

How do I go about doing that?

What do I need to know?

anon20426

My grandson and wife were married in May in NC. They moved to VA. Called it quits yesterday. No children, no property. What is the quickest and least expensive way to get a divorce?

bbelt

My wife and I are planning a divorce after 20 years being married. No one has filed yet. We want to get things agreed on and not wait for the lengthy process and have a judge determine who gets what. We both want to do that now. Does putting a post-nuptial together before we file make sense? Is there another type of agreement available that will legally serve this purpose? We are in Nebraska.

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