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What Does a Resource Specialist Do?

A resource specialist monitors air pollution.
Some human resource specialists may be responsible for evaluating employee performance and addressing the concerns of employees or management.
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  • Written By: T. Webster
  • Edited By: A. Joseph
  • Last Modified Date: 15 August 2014
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A resource specialist can serve in a variety of fields, including those relating to education or employment. There are even career opportunities as air resource specialists. Although the duties of a resource specialist greatly vary by industry, these jobs generally all involve coordinating and compiling informational materials for clients, employees or students.

In an educational system, a resource specialist might coordinate individualized educational programs for students who need tutoring or those who have special needs. Related duties can include providing parents with information about how their children were assessed and any academic strengths and weaknesses. Additionally, a resource specialist in this type of setting might provide parents with information about career or vocational planning for their child.

Some resource specialists work with students in group settings. This can involve meeting in a resource room during regular class time, for example. Students who meet in a group with a resource specialist usually have the same learning needs or difficulties. This can include challenges with a certain academic topic or general learning deficiencies.

An educational resource specialist might also coordinate materials and equipment for use in the classroom. This could include issuing laptop computers for use in the classroom, for example. When there is a heavy emphasis on instructional design or planning, a teaching degree might be required for this role.

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A resource specialist can also work in the employment arena. Working for an agency that helps people seeking employment is just one example. Some of the duties in this role can include, but are not limited to, offering assistance with résumés and interpreting various labor market trends. All of this information is used to help people pursue employment that is best suited to their skills, interests and background.

In a broader sense, there are also human resource specialists. These people often help a company select and screen the best candidates for a job. For employees, human resource specialists are often the first contact points for information about company policies and health insurance benefits. They help ensure that company policies are understood and carried out.

Resource specialists are also found in highly technical fields, such as air quality control. These air resource specialists tend to serve in public health and safety industries that help to ensure that businesses meet any regulatory requirements. This includes monitoring air pollution or meteorological measurements, for example.

An air resource specialist can also cater to homeowners. In this area, the specialist might offer services such as testing for indoor mold and other toxins. The company might also offer products that help maintain good air quality, such as air filters or air conditioning equipment.

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