Why Am I Still Hungry after Breakfast?

If breakfast is the most important meal of the day, how much more ready for the day would you be if you could have two breakfasts?

The idea of "second breakfast" has gained traction, with 62% of Americans wanting it to be recognized as an official meal.
The idea of "second breakfast" has gained traction, with 62% of Americans wanting it to be recognized as an official meal.

That's not a rhetorical question, at least for many people. According to a recent survey by the marketing research firm OnePoll, 62 percent of Americans think "second breakfast" should be recognized as a real thing, right alongside (first) breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

The poll delved into the eating habits of 2,000 Americans. It found that not only does the average U.S. resident enjoy a second breakfast at least once a week, but 70 percent of those who double down on breakfast say they feel more energized than they would otherwise.

Interestingly, the definition of breakfast appears to be fairly vague. Despite a prevalent view that "breakfast" must be eaten before 10:25 am, 43 percent of the respondents said they have no problem eating typical breakfast foods for every meal, and 36 percent do it on a regular basis.

There's no telling where the demand for acceptance of second breakfast as a regular meal might lead, but you can already imagine the restaurant slogan: "Breakfast. It's not just for breakfast anymore."

Starting the day off right:

  • On average, people have breakfast at about 7:30 a.m. on weekdays and an hour later on weekends.

  • Two studies in 2014 caused a stir when they questioned whether breakfast is really the most important meal of the day, stating that the notion is more of a saying than a scientific fact.

  • Breakfast as it looks today -- cereal, eggs, and the like -- didn't exist in America until the second half of the 19th century.

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