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Does London Care About Preserving Its WWII Landmarks?

London holds its WWII landmarks in high esteem, recognizing them as poignant reminders of resilience and history. The city actively preserves these sites, ensuring that future generations can reflect on the past's lessons. How does this preservation impact London's cultural identity and urban landscape? Join the conversation and share your thoughts on this vital aspect of London's heritage.

Those who do not respect the past are sometimes compelled to rebuild it. That was the lesson for the property developer CTLX, who in 2015 knocked down a London pub that had survived the Blitz in World War II, only to be destroyed decades later. CTLX had plans to replace the pub with apartments, but the local government had other ideas, ordering CTLX to rebuild the 100-year-old Carlton Tavern in Maida Vale brick by brick.

Historic England had listed the pub as Grade II of historical importance, and CTLX had been denied permission to demolish it. After ignoring the order and destroying the pub, CTLX incurred the wrath of Westminster City Council, which gave the developer two years to fix its mistake. Due to delays relating to the coronavirus pandemic, the Carlton didn't reopen until May 2021. Carlton Tavern owner Tom Rees, a first-time bar owner, said he was happy with everything, explaining that it was “nice to be in the thick of it again and just feel that buzz” as businesses were allowed to let customers inside once again.

Cheers to the British pub:

  • Six stops on the of London Underground are named for pubs that either once existed or still exist nearby (Elephant & Castle, Manor House, Royal Oak, Maida Vale, Angel and Swiss Cottage).

  • The Nutshell Pub in Bury St. Edmunds is Britain's smallest, according to Guinness World Records; it includes a mummified cat, a propeller, and hanging currency bills.

  • The most common name for a British pub is the Red Lion.

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    • In 2015, developers illegally demolished a London pub that had survived the Blitz during World War II; they were ordered to rebuild it brick by brick.
      In 2015, developers illegally demolished a London pub that had survived the Blitz during World War II; they were ordered to rebuild it brick by brick.