How do I Choose the Best High Fiber Cookies?

Tricia Christensen
Tricia Christensen

Choosing the best high fiber cookies first depends on finding or making cookies with ingredients that increase fiber levels, and then deciding which of these cookies tastes the best. The first part is relatively easy, and the second is really a matter of personal choice, or may reflect the need to fulfill other desired diet goals like having low sugar or low fat cookies. Fortunately, with increasing consciousness of the importance of fiber, people will find both premade cookies and many recipes in health food cookbooks or online that helps to expand choice.

High fiber chocolate chip cookies.
High fiber chocolate chip cookies.

Many nutritionists suggest people need a minimum intake of about 20-25 grams of fiber a day, and they may need more. Most western diets don’t come close to this amount because many of the foods consumed are fairly low in fiber, with perhaps one or two grams in a food serving. The traditional cookie available in the grocery store doesn’t represent the best in high fiber cookies either, and reading the package can let people know exactly how much fiber they’d get in a defined serving.

Raisins are high in fiber, so make a good addition to cookies.
Raisins are high in fiber, so make a good addition to cookies.

Some health-oriented companies have sought to remedy this, and they may provide cookies that contain fiber in much higher amounts, perhaps four or five grams in a serving. This can be pretty significant actually, and fulfill about 20% of daily fiber requirement. It’s unlikely people will find much higher fiber amounts in commercially made cookies, though the occasional health or natural food store could have a brand that features a higher fiber count. Alternately, people might contemplate eating two servings to get more fiber.

Using whole oats can make an oatmeal cookie higher in fiber.
Using whole oats can make an oatmeal cookie higher in fiber.

Another way to boost fiber content is to bake high fiber cookies at home. There are lots of ingredients to choose from that elevate the fiber value of cookies. Whole oats are a natural choice, many nuts and seeds contain fiber, and whole grains of a variety of kinds can be snuck into cookies to make them bulkier. While some ingredients don’t add much to fiber content, their presence can make the cookie taste less like a health food and more like the standard cookie. Raisins, cranberries or chocolate chips are all excellent for this purpose.

Adding flax seeds to cookie dough will boost the fiber content.
Adding flax seeds to cookie dough will boost the fiber content.

The one trouble with making high fiber cookies is that they may have a heavier feel. It’s usually necessary to use more shortening or butter to combine ingredients. Some people may be able to use products like applesauce or molasses to impart additional moisture to the cookies and a little soy lecithin can also be of help. It does take some experimentation to determine what will work, and good recipes can be a boon.

It is important to note that the fiber content of a cookie doesn’t imply its healthfulness on all levels. Some high fiber cookies contain high sugar or fat amounts that means they should still be consumed in small portions. Ultimately, the best sound nutritional fiber sources are usually not cookies.

Cookies can be made with applesauce for some added fiber.
Cookies can be made with applesauce for some added fiber.
Tricia Christensen
Tricia Christensen

Tricia has a Literature degree from Sonoma State University and has been a frequent wiseGEEK contributor for many years. She is especially passionate about reading and writing, although her other interests include medicine, art, film, history, politics, ethics, and religion. Tricia lives in Northern California and is currently working on her first novel.

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