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Why Is Maine Called the Pine Tree State?

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  • Written By: Esther Ejim
  • Edited By: Kaci Lane Hindman
  • Last Modified Date: 25 September 2016
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The "Pine Tree State” is one of the several nicknames for the state of Maine. The reason why Maine is referred to as the “Pine Tree State” is because it is a direct reference to the abundant pine forests located in the state. Maine in general is largely covered by an extensive growth of forest. Approximately 90 percent of the state is covered by various trees including birch, spruce and fir. Maine is called the "Pine Tree State" to the exclusion of other trees and plants because pine trees are quite abundant and a beautiful sight to behold. This state has a number of white pine forests, both commercial and natural, where the beauty of the trees is described by many as breathtaking.

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This aesthetic quality of the pine trees and their ubiquity in the state is the primary reason behind the adoption of the Eastern white pine tree as the official state tree. The official state flower is the white pine cone and tassel. These are some reasons why Maine is known as the “Pine Tree State.” The symbol of the pine tree appears on several official state items. For instance, the pine tree is depicted on the state seal as well as on the state flag. The pine tree is also a source of a thriving industry in Maine, as it is raised in commercial quantities and used in making wood-related items like pulp, paper and toothpicks. These industries contribute to the sustenance and growth of the economy of the state.

Another nickname for the state is “The Lumber State,” due to its large-scale production of lumber and other wood-related products. The heavy forestation of the state has led to the establishment of a thriving lumber industry, which serves as a source of employment. It also brings important revenue to the state through the export of lumber products. Some of the biggest paper mills in the U.S. are located in the state of Maine, and their products are distributed to different parts of the country as well as internationally.

In the early days, when Maine was still a part of the colonies, it had a thriving shipbuilding industry. This business was made possible by the abundant timber reserves in the state. Other types of vessels, like canoes, were also produced in the state. Maine is also called “The Switzerland of America” due to its scenic mountainous terrains and the snowfall.

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matthewc23
Post 6

This article just makes me want to go to Maine even more. It's always been on my list of places I'd like to visit ever since I saw pictures of the forests when I was a kid.

Has anyone ever been? Are there any great places to go to see some of the best forests? I know there are a couple of national forests that get good reviews.

I'm just wondering, but does Maine have any other nicknames? I assume the lobster industry is big there, so I thought maybe there would be a nickname about that.

cardsfan27
Post 5

@jcraig - I would have to guess that may state is the same as most states. Where I live, for something to be declared the state tree, for example, it goes through a lot of the same processes as something getting passed into law. Someone in the state congress introduces the idea, and then the member of the legislature take a vote on it.

I think in most cases this is more of a formality. Hopefully states aren't wasting tax payer time and money debating what the best flower is. Several years back when my state was trying to decided on the state tree, they selected three or four of the most common and popular trees and let school children throughout the state decide. Luckily they chose the white oak, which is a pretty good tree in my opinion.

jcraig
Post 4

Does anyone know how many of Maine's pine trees are used for paper production versus lumber? I know that most of our building wood comes from Douglas firs out west, but for anyone who has seen eastern white pine wood, it is beautiful.

This article did get me wondering, what is the process to get a tree or flower designated as the state tree or flower? I assume the same rules apply for all the different state identifiers, but I'm not sure of how it happens.

BabaB
Post 3

For a state without too many other industries, it's good that the lumber industry there is doing well. All the other related industries that are related to lumber help the economy of the state.

I wonder if there have been many cutbacks in the timber industry with the slowed economy of the last few years.

I'm curious to know how much of a problem Maine has with forest fires. Also, does anyone know what kind of programs they have for reforestation?

B707
Post 2

I've seen parts of Maine in the summer, and would like to see it in the other seasons. It really is a beautiful state. It reminds me of my home state of Washington, in some ways. Maine is the "Pine Tree State" and Washington is known as the "Evergreen State." They both have huge stands of trees.

Both states have lumber industries and grow a lot of Christmas trees. It's interesting that one state is in the northwest corner of the U.S. and the other is in the northeast corner.

OeKc05
Post 1

Maine must produce a lot of pine mulch! I would love to live in a place with tons of pine trees on my property. I have to buy bundles of pine mulch every year to spread around my flowers to choke out weeds and preserve moisture, and I would save a lot of money if I could gather my own.

People in Maine could make lots of their own Christmas ornaments from the pine cones, also. I know several people who spray paint the cones silver and hang them from string on Christmas trees. If I lived in Maine, I could make these and sell them.

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