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Who is Archduke Francis Ferdinand?

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  • Written By: Mary McMahon
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 28 November 2016
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The Archduke Francis Ferdinand is a historical figure who is most well-known for being assassinated, an event that served as the catalyst for World War I. This conflict ultimately involved much of Europe, along with its allies overseas, such as the United States, Russia, and the Ottoman Empire. Had the archduke not been assassinated, he might not have become so well known, and 20th century Europe might have been a very different place.

Ferdinand was born in 1863 into the House of Hapsburg, a royal family that had ruled over Austria for generations. Initially, he was not a very prominent figure in the family tree, but due to a series of deaths, he found himself directly in line for the succession to the Austro-Hungarian throne. At the time of his death, the archduke held a number of royal titles, including the position of Prince Imperial of Austria and the Royal Prince of Hungary and Bohemia.

Like most members of royal families, Archduke Francis Ferdinand had access to an excellent education that placed a heavy emphasis on history and courtly tradition. He also served in the military, rising to the rank of third lieutenant, and cultivated a passion for traveling to exotic locales, hunting on the game-rich estates of the Austro-Hungarian empire, and jousting.

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In 1899, he married Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, enduring considerable opposition before the marriage was permitted to go through. Although the duchess was of royal birth, she was not a member of the House of Hapsburg, and she was therefore considered ineligible for a position on the throne. Ultimately, Ferdinand had to consent to a morganatic marriage, in which she would be denied rank, title, and privileges. The couple had three children.

On 28 July 1914, the couple were traveling in the city of Sarajevo when they were shot by an assassin belonging to the Black Hand, a Serbian separatist group. Francis died almost instantly, and Sophie never reached the hospital. The incident provided Austria-Hungary with an excuse to declare war on the Serbian Empire, sparking the start of the war.

Had Archduke Francis Ferdinand ascended to the throne, his moderate and reformist policies might have reshaped the government dramatically. Instead, his death plunged Europe into “the war to end all wars,” a war that ultimately drew in allies on other continents.

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Misscoco
Post 6

In some ways, when royalty was such an important part of so many countries, life as a royal person could be very difficult.

You might be thrown into the position of ruler of the land when you were young and lacking any experience.

As a child you were raised mostly by employees of the castle, your parents were too busy to take on much child care.

There was usually quarreling among the royalty and poisonings and killings happened. You had to be on your guard.

And as the article mentioned, marriage could often be difficult if one partner didn't belong to an acceptable family branch. If the marriage happened, one might not have the status and rights that they were used to.

BoniJ
Post 5

@Chivebasil - What an incredible story. It made my day. Those little tidbits make history so interesting and human-like, rather than just learning the dry facts. I wish they would teach more of that kind of thing in history to our students.

I guess the royalty could get whatever they wanted. But it must have been very uncomfortable to wear such tight,fitted clothing. I wonder how often he changed his clothes!

His assassination was the spark that started World War I, but things were so intense in Europe at the time, if it hadn't been the assassination, some other conflict would probably have lead to war.

Azuza
Post 4

@SZapper - Well, you may be comforted to know that Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his wife were at least laid to rest together. Apparently her "status" didn't prevent that at least!

Anyway, it seems that these days the world has calmed down about marriages of "unequal status." The marriage between Prince William and Catherine Middleton, a commoner, clearly shows this. I think the world has come far since the early 1900's.

SZapper
Post 3

When I took world history, I always remember feeling bad for his poor wife, Sophie. Even though they were allowed to eventually marry, Sophie was never treated as an equal by members of the royal family. In fact, most of Archduke Ferdinand's family refused to attend the wedding!

Then, once they were married, Sophie didn't get to have any royal privileges, even though she was married to the Archduke. She wasn't even allowed to ride in the "Royal Carriage" with her husband.

The whole thing seems ridiculous to me, but they must have really loved each other. Many people tried to convince Francis Ferdinand not to marry Sophie. Then, when they got married, she had to put up with all that abuse.

gravois
Post 2

The assassination of Archduke Ferdinand is often cited as the cause of WWI but really there were a number of historical, sociological and political factors that went into the start of the war. The assassination may have been the catalyst, but if he had never been killed it is likely that something else would have set off the war.

I almost feel bad for him. First he gets assassinated, then he lives forever in infamy as the cause of one of the bloodiest wars in human history.

chivebasil
Post 1

I once heard an amazing piece of trivia about the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand. It has always stuck with me.

Apparently he was incredibly vain, especially when it came to clothes. He insisted that all his clothes fit perfectly and the style of the times was to wear fairly tight clothes. He was so fanatical about this that he would often have tailors literally sew him into his clothes.

When he was shot it took a particularly long time to treat the wound because doctors could not easily get to it. He had to have his clothes removed, many of which were thick material expertly sew to conform to his body. If they had had easier access to

the wound they may have been able to save his life.

Who knows how the history of the 20th century might have been different if this man had different tastes in clothes. I guess this just goes to show that minor details can have huge consequences.

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