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What Should I Expect from Alcohol Rehabilitation?

It is imperative that people who drink excessively withdraw under medical supervision.
The length of a rehabilitation program is determined by how often a person drinks.
Alcohol rehabilitation may involve both a physical detoxification and counseling sessions.
Alcohol withdrawal treatment is determined by the severity of the symptoms.
Group therapy is one option for individuals who struggle with alcoholism.
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  • Written By: Allison Boelcke
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 02 April 2015
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Alcohol rehabilitation is the treatment for the physical and psychological addiction to alcohol. It begins with a physical detoxification to rid the body of alcohol, then uses counseling sessions to get to the root of behavioral or mental issues that contributed to alcohol dependency. The final part of the rehabilitation process is aftercare to help individuals acclimate into society without falling back into their addiction.

Treatment can take place on an outpatient or residential basis. An outpatient alcohol rehabilitation treatment is conducted during the day at a treatment center, then patients return home in the evening. It is usually for people with an alcohol problem that has not become life-threatening. Those with a severe, life threatening alcohol addiction may require residential rehabilitation. They live at the treatment center in order to receive constant care.

The first thing to expect when you check into an alcohol rehabilitation center is the immediate detoxification process. You won’t be allowed any alcohol, in order to give your body the opportunity to remove all the toxins from the excessive amounts of alcohol. Since your system is used to having alcohol, you will most likely experience physical withdrawal symptoms during the first three days, such as sweating, chills, depression, mood swings, or even blackouts. Depending on the extent of your alcohol addiction, it may take from one to two weeks to completely cleanse your system.

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After the detoxification process, alcohol rehabilitation works on the psychological aspects of your alcohol addiction. You will usually first meet with an addiction treatment counselor for private sessions to discuss any life events or choices that may have contributed to your addiction. Your counselor will work with you to offer solutions to any mental or behavioral issues. In addition to one-on-one counseling sessions, you will also meet with other recovering addicts under the supervision of a counselor in group therapy to share common experiences. Group therapy may help you feel understood and supported by others in your same position.

Once you have become sober and gained an understanding of your addiction issues, you are generally finished with the main portion of alcohol rehabilitation. After you leave the treatment and return to your normal life, you may also be recommended to attend an aftercare program to ensure you learn the proper coping strategies so you don’t backtrack into alcohol addiction. An aftercare program is similar to the group therapy sessions during treatment. You will meet with other recovering addicts and a treatment counselor, who will give you advice on how to stay sober and deal with temptation, stress, or old friends who pressure you to drink.

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Phaedrus
Post 3

I have a surprising number of friends tell me they have gone to some sort of drug and alcohol rehabilitation center. It's not limited to people from broken homes or junkies who hit bottom and have no other choice. These people are from good homes and are gainfully employed. They just have a problem controlling themselves around alcohol or drugs.

One friend told me that she wanted to leave about a week after she arrived. She was suffering from alcohol withdrawal, and the staff kept pushing her to attend early morning group sessions and do some demeaning chores. The center did say there was an "open door" policy, meaning anyone who wanted to leave voluntarily was free to do

so. It was not a prison. In fact, it was one of the most beautiful facilities in the area.

She said that the grounds were so nice and peaceful that she spent a lot of time outdoors, which was something she rarely did when she was an active alcoholic. She said there were a few clients who tried to smuggle in contraband, but most of them were trying to get their lives back together and took the program very seriously.

Buster29
Post 2

I have a surprising number of friends tell me they have gone to some sort of drug and alcohol rehabilitation center. It's not limited to people from broken homes or junkies who hit bottom and have no other choice. These people are from good homes and are gainfully employed. They just have a problem controlling themselves around alcohol or drugs.

One friend told me that she wanted to leave about a week after she arrived. She was suffering from alcohol withdrawal, and the staff kept pushing her to attend early morning group sessions and do some demeaning chores. The center did say there was an "open door" policy, meaning anyone who wanted to leave voluntarily was free to do

so. It was not a prison. In fact, it was one of the most beautiful facilities in the area.

She said that the grounds were so nice and peaceful that she spent a lot of time outdoors, which was something she rarely did when she was an active alcoholic. She said there were a few clients who tried to smuggle in contraband, but most of them were trying to get their lives back together and took the program very seriously.

mrwormy
Post 1

I had to go into alcohol rehabilitation when I was in my late 20s. I did a lot of binge drinking while in college, but I had trouble cutting back on it when I graduated and started working at a high-pressure job. I started showing up at work while still extremely drunk, and my boss gave me an ultimatum. If I wanted to keep working there, I'd have to go to an alcohol rehabilitation center. My health insurance actually covered most of the cost.

The first few weeks were the absolute worst, because my body had become accustomed to having alcohol in it. I was sick as a dog every morning, and there were nurses who made sure I

maintained my personal hygiene and other routines. These centers won't let you sit around in your dirty clothes and feel sorry for yourself.

I thought the group sessions were especially helpful, because I didn't realize how bad an addiction to drugs or alcohol could get. I thought I was managing my own drunken life pretty well, but that turned out to be a lie. I was just as sick as anybody else in that group. I'm so glad I spent the entire 28 days there, and my boss did hire me back when I got out.

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