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What Is the State Tree of Texas?

Texas' state tree is the pecan tree.
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  • Last Modified Date: 26 August 2014
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In 1919, the U.S. state of Texas chose the pecan tree as a representative symbol. Pecan trees produce nuts and are found in most areas of Texas. The tree is native to the state, and the nuts were, at various points in the state's history, important economic products. Native Algonquin Americans who lived in the region once called the fruit of the pecan tree "peccan," according to the Texas State Historical Association. "Peccan" referred to a nut with a hard shell.

Modern pecan nuts may be of the traditional variety or they may be one of several new varieties that farmers cross-bred for improved features. The harvesters of both kinds of nuts shake them off trees to harvest them, though the collection methods vary in other ways. One grower may simply catch the shaken nuts with a sheet, and another may use machinery to collect them directly off the tree. The state tree of Texas may grow as tall as 70 feet (about 21 meters), which can require very tall harvesting machines.

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The state tree of Texas is a slow-growing plant, and after a farmer plants a pecan orchard, he or she needs to wait at least five years before the nuts are harvested. Even after the trees mature, the nuts can be targets for pests. Animal pests that like pecans include squirrels and crows. Deer can also destroy the state tree of Texas easily when they use the young trees as rubbing posts for their antlers. As well as animals, insects like weevils, worms and aphids are also attracted to the tree and can cause significant damage to it.

Scientifically the state tree of Texas has the name Carya illinoensis, and is deciduous, which means it loses its leaves every year. The tree is actually closely related to the walnut and hickory plants. It grows across much of the state, and was always a food source for people living in the Americas. After the Europeans discovered the continent, however, they exported the nut across the ocean and into Europe.

Part of the reason Texas chose the pecan as the state tree, apart from the historical and widespread presence of the tree in the state, was that a former governor named James Hogg asked that when he died, his mourners would plant a pecan at one end of his grave, and promote the propagation of the nuts among the people of Texas. The success of the pecan in the state as a food crop adds to the symbolism of the tree to the locality.

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SarahSon
Post 3

I have always been curious about the correct pronunciation of this word. I have heard this pronounced more than one way even though they are referring to the same nut.

I always figured it just depended on what part of the country you grew up in. No matter how it is pronounced, if you are a pecan lover, you know there is nothing better than a slice of warm pecan pie fresh out of the oven.

julies
Post 2

We have a lot of walnut trees where I live and I hardly ever go outside and gather walnuts off the ground. It can be quite a process to get the meat out of the nut, and I have found it easier to go to the store and buy a package of them.

The same thing would probably happen if I had pecan trees in my yard. If you don't have much time, or the right equipment, it can seem like more trouble than it is worth.

It also sounds like the deer can do as much damage to the pecan trees as they do to my trees in the yard. They rub their antlers on the small trees and have ruined more than one tree.

I think it would be pretty frustrating to have a slow growing pecan tree ruined by all the deer that are around.

golf07
Post 1

I wish I lived in a state that was warm enough to grow pecan trees. This is one of my favorite nuts, and they can be kind of expensive to buy in the store.

When my husband was in college, a old friend would make a pecan pie for him whenever he asked for one. The only thing she asked is that he buy the pecans for them.

When I went to buy pecans to make my first pie, I understood why she asked him to do this. They were more expensive than I thought they would be.

If I had my own pecan tree growing in the back yard, I could have access to as many pecans as I needed.

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