Category: 

What is the Kohinoor Diamond?

Article Details
  • Written By: Mary McMahon
  • Edited By: O. Wallace
  • Last Modified Date: 17 April 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2014
    Conjecture Corporation
  • Print this Article
Free Widgets for your Site/Blog
Solar energy currently harnessed for electricity represents less than one-tenth of 1% of global energy production.  more...

April 21 ,  1509 :  Henry VIII became the king of England.  more...

The Kohinoor or Koh-I-Noor diamond is a famous diamond currently in the hands of the British Crown. Like many famous named diamonds, the Kohinoor is accompanied by numerous legends, including stories that suggest it is cursed with violence. The history of the diamond has certainly been accompanied with violent struggle, but this may have less to do with a curse than it does with the value of the diamond; the Kohinoor diamond was once one of the largest diamonds in the world, and large diamonds fetch high prices.

The origins of this diamond are a bit mysterious. The Kohinoor diamond appears to have been mined in Kollur Mines of the Andhra Pradesh region of India, with the first firm recorded story about the diamond dating to the early 16th century. Indian legends, however, state that the Kohinoor diamond is actually thousands of years old, with some stories saying that it was created by the gods while others say that it was found in the Godavari River.

Ad

Whatever the origins of the diamond, the 186 Kohinoor was one among many fabulous items owned by the Mughal Emperors of India. It passed among a number of owners, sometimes in rather suspicious ways, before being seized by the British East India Company and presented to Queen Victoria. The Kohinoor diamond was one of the most notable items looted from India by the British, and it continues to be brought up in diplomatic negotiations, with several attempts to negotiate the return of the diamond to its homeland.

Historically, Indian diamond cutters focused on preserving the size of a diamond, not on cutting for brilliance. As a result, the Kohinoor diamond failed to astound the public or the Crown when it was brought to England. Prince Albert ordered the diamond recut, transforming the diamond into a 105 carat brilliant. The loss of around 40% of the diamond's size was viewed as an acceptable trade for a stone of much higher quality.

It has been said that whoever owns the Kohinoor diamond will control the world. The British Empire certainly did control large chunks of the world at some point, although its influence has dwindled considerably since the years of the Anglo-Sikh War when the Kohinoor was taken from India. Today, the diamond can be seen on display at the Tower of London along with other objects in the Crown Jewels, and it is brought out for ceremonial occasions.

Ad

Discuss this Article

anon253359
Post 11

How did this connect to the British empire?

anon91158
Post 5

let it remain with British, as it is a curse and we can see that it is working. why fight and debate for something that brings bad luck?

anon86388
Post 4

The Kohinoor diamond originated from my state andhra pradesh, where i was born.So i feel it's mine, no matter wherever it stays. I am a rich person. Wow!

anon85820
Post 3

you should return kohi-noor back to india.

anon49246
Post 2

why not sell it and then pay back some of our national debt? We owe nearly a trillion pounds. how much is the diamond worth? UK resident

anon40100
Post 1

The Kohinoor diamond's origin is India. Why not return it to India?

Post your comments

Post Anonymously

Login

username
password
forgot password?

Register

username
password
confirm
email