Category: 

What Is Raisin Wine?

Article Details
  • Written By: Emily Pate
  • Edited By: A. Joseph
  • Last Modified Date: 27 October 2016
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2016
    Conjecture Corporation
  • Print this Article
Free Widgets for your Site/Blog
Although they mainly functioned as downspouts, gargoyles were also intended to scare people into attending church.  more...

December 3 ,  1989 :  The Cold War officially ended.  more...

Raisin wine, also called straw wine, is a sweet wine made from grapes that have been laid or hung to dry, usually in the sun. The type of raisin, drying method and winemaking method can vary between wineries and regions. This beverage was traditionally made in parts of France and Northern Italy, but winemakers around the world had begun making this wine by the late 20th century.

The wine dates back to about 800 B.C., when it first appeared in Greek poetry. Hesiod, a poet, made reference to a raisin wine named Cypriot Manna. Winemakers twisted grape stems to prevent sap from reaching the fruit, causing it to dry, or they'd pick the fruit and lay it out to dry. The labor-intensive method changed little in many regions and artisan wineries, even into the 21st century. This drying process is so time consuming, and it produces few raisins, so quality raisin wine typically is expensive.

Typical raisin wine recipes feature little more than raisins, water, citrus juice or acid and sugar. A winemaker might add wine yeast to the recipe so he or she can sterilize the wine with a potassium or sodium metabisulfite tablet. The tablet sits in the wine for 24 hours, killing any harmful bacteria along with the natural yeast. Package yeast added back to the wine helps the wine ferment.

Ad

Straw wine is another common name for raisin wine, because the grapes are traditionally laid out on straw to dry in the sun. Wineries might hang, cover or rack grapes to dry, depending on their location. In Austria, for instance, regulations dictate that grapes for strohwein, or straw wine, must be laid out on straw or reed or hung on string to dry. They sit for several months before pressing. Other common names vary between countries and regions, including slamove vino in Czech Republic, vin de paille in France and commandaria in Greece.

Raisin wine's quality, sweetness and color largely depend on the type and quality of raisins used. Muscat and white raisins add only subtle caramel flavor and light hue, for instance, and dark raisins create a sweeter flavor and darker wine. The raisin cultivation, drying and manufacturing process also effect the wine. Early raisin wine featured naturally dried raisins with no preservatives, and commercial raisins used in the 20th and 21st centuries, especially in home wine making, sometimes had preservatives and an oil coating added, affecting the wine's flavor.

Winemakers also add raisins to other types of sweet, fruity wines. Raisins add body and texture to the wine, almost thickening it. The addition also makes the featured fruit flavor stand out and last longer on the tongue.

Ad

You might also Like

Recommended

Discuss this Article

Viranty
Post 3

@RoyalSpyder - My advice to you is that next time you go out to a restaurant, aim for a non-alcoholic beverage. As Chmander states, they are some of the safest. Once you become comfortable with those, maybe you could try some of the stronger drinks. As an even better suggestion, try some of the "fruity" beverages, such as raisin wine. The flavor and sweetness are huge qualities, and the generally overpower what would essentially be bitter and pungent.

Chmander
Post 2

Some alcoholic beverages are stronger than others, but one thing you need to know is that the "safest" beverages are those which aren't really that strong. For the less alcoholic drinks, you'd have to drink a lot before becoming intoxicated. However, some the stronger drinks, such as beer, aren't really recommended. Also, you're right about the article. It's very intriguing seeing how some of these wines are made.

RoyalSpyder
Post 1

After reading this article, I was wondering, what is the safest kind of alcoholic beverage? I'm about to have my first drink soon, and I seriously don't want to overdo it. The article is very interesting, and it shows how not "alcoholic" beverages will cause you to become intoxicated. Does anyone have any tips or suggestions?

Post your comments

Post Anonymously

Login

username
password
forgot password?

Register

username
password
confirm
email