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What Is Persipan?

Persipan is made from peach (or apricot) kernels.
Peach pits are ground and added to sugar to make persipan.
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  • Written By: Angie Bates
  • Edited By: John Allen
  • Last Modified Date: 08 July 2014
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Made primarily from sugar and ground apricot or peach cores, persipan is a substitute for the dessert filling marzipan. The term itself is a hybrid of the scientific name for the peach, Prunus persica, and "marzipan." The filling is created in the same way marzipan is made, but since it uses peach cores instead of almonds, it is considerably cheaper than marzipan.

Like marzipan, persipan is made worldwide but is most popular in Europe. Whereas marzipan is created by grinding almonds and mixing them with sugar, persipan is created by grinding peach or apricot pits, often called kernels, and adding those to sugar. This combination creates a paste from which the filling is created, generally by adding more sugar. The paste will contain about 35 percent sugar. The filling, however, will have closer to 60 percent sugar.

Unlike marzipan, persipan often contains 0.5 percent starch. Since the fillings closely resemble each other, the starch is often a required addition so persipan can be easily distinguished visually from marzipan using an iodine test. When iodine solution comes in contact with starch, it dyes the starch dark purple.

Both peach and apricot kernels are poisonous in their raw state. They contain amygdalin, which, when broken down, becomes hydrogen cyanide. These kernels are never safe to eat raw and must be processed before they are used in order to remove the toxin. The toxin is also the reason these fruit cores are not often used in food production and are, therefore, less costly.

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Persipan is generally considered of lower quality than marzipan. There is also a difference in taste which some people prefer over marzipan. Additionally, persipan often contains more sugar than its more expensive counterpart in order to combat the bitter taste of the fruit kernels.

Although persipan can be used as a substitute for marzipan in any type of dish, commercially, cake fillings and cookies are the most common desserts that use the substitute. Marzipan is also frequently found in candies, but persipan is rarely used commercially for candy treats. The paste, however, can be purchased online or in some European stores for use in homemade desserts.

Since they are often an ingredient in holiday treats, both fillings are most frequently found around Christmas. In Germany, however, both can be found year-round. In the United States, these fillings are far less popular. Though marzipan can be found commercially in the US, generally around the holiday season, most Americans are not familiar with persipan at all.

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Discuss this Article

anon947438
Post 6

Please can someone tell me where to buy it in the UK, or where to order it online, even if it's in bulk? I can't find it anywhere.

bear78
Post 5

Actually, aside from peach and apricot cores, persipan also sometimes refers to filling made with bitter almond cores.

The bitter almond is not preferred for marzipan and so many marzipan manufacturers actually use the bitter cores to make persipan which is sold at a lower price.

I know that most of the persipan in the U.S. is imported from Europe, but the actual fruit cores generally come from elsewhere. The persipan I use is made with apricot cores from Iran.

So just because it may be processed and made in one place doesn't mean that the actual kernels are from the same place. Just wanted to point that out in case anyone wants to pay attention to the source when buying.

burcidi
Post 4

@simrin-- I'm glad you're enjoying persipan candies.

Have you ever tried ameretti liquor? That also has persipan and I think if you like persipan sweets so much, you will also love this liquor.

If you fancy cooking with persipan, there are international groceries and online shops that sell it in plain bulk. They also have different varieties, like more bitter or more sweet, depending on what you prefer.

SteamLouis
Post 3

I love trying different German and European snacks, cookies and sweets from International grocery stores. I've noticed that persipan is used in quite a few of them and I had to look it up because I've never heard of it as an ingredient before.

My favorite treats are German Domino treats which is a combination of persipan, fruit jelly and chocolate. It is very delicious, great for having with coffee.

I'm really enjoying persipan sweets and now that I know what it is, I think I'm going to be stocking up on them for the holidays. It would be great as holiday gifts and treats for the guests.

John57
Post 2

I have tasted both marzipan and persipan and I couldn't tell too much difference between the two.

One reason might be because the persipan filling I tried had some ground almonds in with the peaches. This would be more like a combination of the two fillings.

I actually liked the taste of this better than the marzipan alone. Many people have never heard of either of them, but once they taste that sweet filling, wonder what it is made of.

honeybees
Post 1

I am familiar with marzipan as I have a favorite holiday recipe that calls for this. The only time I look for marzipan on the shelf is around Christmas time, and have always been able to find it without too much trouble.

This is the first time I have heard about persipan and it sounds like it could be used in place of marzipan for most recipes if you needed to.

Since I love the taste of peaches and almonds, both of these sound like they could be a tasty filling.

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