Category: 

What is Farmer Cheese?

Farmer's cheese is traditionally made on small farms.
Farmer cheese can be made from the milk of goats, cows, sheep and even yaks.
Farmer cheese can be used to substitute ricotta cheese in lasagna.
Article Details
  • Originally Written By: Mary McMahon
  • Revised By: C. Mitchell
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 09 September 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2014
    Conjecture Corporation
  • Print this Article
Free Widgets for your Site/Blog
Over 33% of the 800 plant species on the island of Socotra off the coast of Yemen are not found anywhere else on Earth.  more...

September 19 ,  1957 :  The US conducted the world's first underground nuclear explosion in Nevada.  more...

Farmer cheese, also sometimes called farmer’s cheese, is a type of simple, soft white cheese traditionally made on farms in Europe and the Middle East. Most of the varieties available in Western markets are made from the milk of goats or cows, but sheep, yak, and most any other sort of milk can also be used, depending on availability and freshness. It is generally quick and easy to make, and is a favorite of home cheesemakers as something of a beginner’s project. In most cases, the cheese is firm enough to be sliced but also soft enough to be spread, at least at room temperature.

How It’s Made

Making farmer’s cheese is relatively simple as all that is usually needed is milk, some sort of acid or starter, and active rennet, which is a bacterial culture. Rennet is not strictly required, but usually speeds the process. Once the acid and rennet begin to interact with the milk, the milk separates into curds, which are solids, and whey, which is a thick liquid. Farmer cheese is made only from the curds. These are filtered out, then pressed into a mold or rolled into a tight lump and squeezed to remove excess moisture.

Ad

One of the characteristic features of farmer cheese is that it is unaged. In practical terms, this means that it is ready to eat as soon as it has dried. Aged cheeses often have sharper, more developed flavors, but they take a long time to ripen; farmer varieties are notoriously mild, but typically very pleasing.

Basic Texture and Flavor

When made properly, farmer cheese should be easily sliced but also roughly spreadable. The ideal consistency usually falls somewhere between a fresh Mozzarella and a soft cheddar — it will hold its own shape, but is not usually so dry as to be crumbly. Different farmers and manufacturers have different styles, and as such not all cheeses marked “farmer” are necessarily the same — some are denser, crumblier, or wetter than others. The flavor is usually consistent, however, and is typically reminiscent of a creamy cottage cheese. It is mostly mild, but often carries a bit of a tang and can pair well with both sweet and savory accompaniments.

Common Additions

Farmer cheese is often praised for its simplicity, though it is also a good canvas for experimentation and different additions. Adventurous cheesemakers have long sought to improve their basic recipes by introducing ingredients like herbs, spices, fruits or vegetables to flavor the curds as they dry. A range of so-called “gourmet” farmer's cheeses has been born this way. Hosts and home cooks can get similar results by simply pairing a plain cheese with savory or sweet spreads and jams.

Uses

One of the most common ways to serve farmer cheese is sliced on crackers or bread, but this is not to say that the cheese is not highly versatile. People commonly use plain versions as a substitute or enhancement for ricotta cheese in baked dishes like lasagna or blintzes. It can also be used as a stuffing for ravioli, as a topping for salads, or as an accompaniment to smoked or dried meats.

Storage and Use Tips

It is usually a good idea to eat farmer cheese within a few days of buying or making it, as it is best in both flavor and consistency when very fresh. Absent any sort of aging treatment, it is also somewhat unstable; this means that it will spoil much faster than more processed and conditioned cheeses. As with nearly all dairy products, it should be stored under refrigeration until ready to serve or cook.

Ad

More from Wisegeek

You might also Like

Discuss this Article

anon323771
Post 4

I live in Pennsylvania and eat farmer's cheese bought straight from Amish markets pretty regularly. Here it is maybe a little firmer than mozzarella, but not spreadable.

I am an absolute cheese lover, and farmer's cheese is my favorite kind! I typically just eat it right off the block as a snack, but it also makes an amazing grilled cheese!

anon71391
Post 2

In the Upper Midwest, Farmer Cheese is not spreadable. It is more the texture of Gouda or Monterey Jack, and you wouldn't be able to use it in place of ricotta or cream cheese. This article needs more research.

spasiba
Post 1

I have found a supermarket that sells farmers cheese. Actually this supermarket has a number of ethnic foods, maybe that is why. It comes in regular and low fat.

It is good to spread on bread, or in crepes.

Post your comments

Post Anonymously

Login

username
password
forgot password?

Register

username
password
confirm
email