Category: 

What Is Ergosterol?

Ergosterol is an intrinsic component of fungal cells, like those in mushrooms.
Mushrooms are rich in ergosterol, or pro-vitamin D2.
Article Details
  • Written By: Geisha A. Legazpi
  • Edited By: Allegra J. Lingo
  • Last Modified Date: 23 October 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2014
    Conjecture Corporation
  • Print this Article
Free Widgets for your Site/Blog
Sharks hunt by sensing electromagnetic fields produced by their prey.  more...

October 24 ,  1929 :  The Black Thursday crash in the US stock market took place.  more...

Ergosterol, or provitamin D2, is a compound that belongs to the steroid family and is related to cholesterol. It is found in fungi such as Saccharomyces and Candida. This compound is an essential sterol component of fungal and protozoal cell membranes, so it is an important target of antifungal drugs and anti-trypanosomal drugs. In 1927, the relationship of ergosterol and vitamin D was discovered when it was shown that upon exposure to ultraviolet radiation, ergosterol could be used to treat rickets, a disease caused by vitamin D deficiency. It is now known that this compound is a provitamin, or a precursor to vitamin D2 or ergocalciferol.

This compound is structurally similar to cholesterol and when subjected to ultraviolet light, it is turned into vitamin D2. As it is an intrinsic component of fungal cells, it is also found in mushrooms. Other dietary sources include fish liver oil, egg yolk, fortified milk, and other dairy products. Irradiation or exposure of these dietary sources to sunlight results in the conversion of ergosterol into ergocalciferol. Therefore, ergosterol-containing foods and supplements provide a good source of vitamin D, an important nutrient for strong bones and teeth as well as proper calcium balance.

Ad

Ergosterol is present in fungi but absent in animals, which is why it serves a big role in the treatment of fungal infections. For instance, amphotericin B, an antifungal drug, binds to ergosterol in order to create pores in the fungal cell membrane. Potassium and other ions and molecules leak through these pores, leading to an imbalance in the internal environment of the fungal cell. This subsequently results in cell death. Amphotericin B, however, has potentially lethal adverse effects, making it a last-line treatment for serious and life-threatening systemic fungal infections.

The azoles, such as clotrimazole, itraconazole, and miconazole, kill fungal cells by inhibiting the enzyme called 14-alpha-demethylase. This enzyme is needed for the production of ergosterol from a precursor compound called lanosterol. Several azole drugs inhibit estrogen production during pregnancy and may cause adverse effects on the fetus.

In its isolated form, provitamin D2 appears as a white or yellow powder that is insoluble in water. This crystalline powder is an irritant to the skin, the mucous membranes of the eyes, and the respiratory tract. Excessive ingestion of this powder can lead to elevated calcium levels in the blood, or hypercalcemia. If left unaddressed, hypercalcemia leads to deposition of calcium salts in different organs of the body.

Ad

More from Wisegeek

You might also Like

Discuss this Article

anon261323
Post 3

If ergosterol is present in fungi, but absent from animals, how is it found in fish liver oil, egg yolk and dairy products and in all foods of animal origin?

Oceana
Post 2

I’m glad that dairy products and eggs contain ergosterol, because this means I get plenty of it. I eat two cartons of yogurt every day, and I eat scrambled eggs for breakfast each morning.

I also put milk in my coffee and cereal. I use heavy whipping cream in desserts that I make, and I love ice cream.

I had never heard of ergosterol before reading this article. It’s always good news to find out that what you have been eating all along contains something that is beneficial to your body.

kylee07drg
Post 1

I took tioconazole to treat my yeast infection. I ended up having a horrible allergic reaction. The area kept swelling until I went to the emergency room. Telling them what was wrong was a bit embarrassing.

I had taken azole drugs in the past and gotten good results. I don’t know why I reacted this way with tioconazole. The other azoles got rid of my yeast infections and the itching within a few days.

Most people take miconazole for this type of infection, but it has never worked for me. I guess every azole is different. Now, I am afraid to take any of them. I don’t want a repeat of that swelling.

Post your comments

Post Anonymously

Login

username
password
forgot password?

Register

username
password
confirm
email