Category: 

What is Elective Surgery?

A patient being given inhalational anaesthetic before elective surgery.
Hip replacement surgery is sometimes an elective surgery.
Elective surgery is non-emergency and allows the doctor and patient to determine the best time for completion.
A woman preparing to get cosmetic surgery, a type of elective surgery.
Article Details
  • Written By: Mary McMahon
  • Edited By: O. Wallace
  • Last Modified Date: 22 October 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2014
    Conjecture Corporation
  • Print this Article
Free Widgets for your Site/Blog
Sharks hunt by sensing electromagnetic fields produced by their prey.  more...

October 24 ,  1929 :  The Black Thursday crash in the US stock market took place.  more...

Elective surgery is non-emergency surgery which is planned, allowing the patient and doctor to determine the best time and place for it. There are a wide range of procedures which could be considered elective, ranging from a hip replacement to a rhinoplasty, and elective surgical procedures are offered at most hospitals. The primary advantage of elective surgery is that it has a much more controllable and predictable outcome, since the variant of chance and emergency circumstances is removed.

Some elective procedures are medically necessary, but not urgent. These types of surgeries are usually discussed at length with a doctor before the surgery takes place, and the patient may seek out second opinions and appointments with other surgeons to find the best surgeon for his or her needs. A lumpectomy to remove a lump from the breast is an example of a medically necessary emergency surgery.

Other elective procedures are considered to be cosmetic in nature, which means that they do not have a direct medical value. For the patient, however, they may be very beneficial to self esteem and social standing. For example, a procedure to remove a port wine stain on the face is an elective cosmetic surgery, but the removal of the port wine stain will make a large difference in the patient's life.

Ad

Sometimes, the difference between “elective surgery” and “optional surgery” is confused, especially by insurance companies, who generally like to avoid paying for procedures which are not medically necessary. An insurance company may decline to pay for knee replacement surgery, under the argument that the patient will not die without it, even if his or her quality of life will be greatly reduced, and a doctor could argue that the procedure was medically necessary. This can lead to battles between patients and their insurance companies in an attempt to get an elective procedure covered, and it is a very good idea to check with an insurance company about a surgery's status before undergoing elective surgery.

Although elective surgery takes place in a non-emergency situation, allowing for greater control, it can still be dangerous. The patient is at risk for adverse reactions to anesthesia, infections, and a variety of surgical complications which should all be discussed before the surgery takes place. Typically, surgeons like to run tests and meet with patients before operating, to confirm that the patients are good candidates for the surgery, and patients will be expected to follow aftercare instructions and attend follow up appointments to monitor the success of the surgery.

Ad

More from Wisegeek

You might also Like

Discuss this Article

anon297903
Post 4

I need a hysterectomy because I have a 10cm fibroid. Health insurance companies call it elective surgery and they feel that it doesn't have to come out right away and not help to pay for it. It stops being elective when you have pain, discomfort and bleeding. My GYN said that other treatments won't work because of the size of the fibroid and a hysterectomy is my only choice. That is non elective and there's no ifs, ands or buts about it.

GeminiMama
Post 3

Snoopy123- That stinks, I bet that was expensive. My toe caused pain and embarrassment, but didn't disrupt my life like your stomach issues.

My toe surgery went well and my insurance company covered it. If someone can prove their tummy tuck is medically necessary, they should consider it. I mean, all those skin removals after weight loss surgery get covered.

Snoopy123
Post 2

My elective surgery wasn’t considered by my insurance. Having two children split my stomach muscles practically in two. No matter how many sit ups or Pilates classes I took, my mommy pooch wouldn’t shrink. I have a toned body everywhere else, but no matter what my skin and stomach were unsightly.

Since we depend on our stomach muscles for things we take for granted. My back was working harder to make up for the loss of my stomach, so I started to have lower back problems. Despite my attempts, the tummy tuck was declined and I paid out of pocket. Not only has my self esteem improved, but my back problems disappeared.

GeminiMama
Post 1

One of my toes is longer than the same toe on the opposite foot. It is causing discomfort for the bones underneath my foot because of the pressure and that toe occasionally gets corns, which is extremely embarrassing. My doctor suggests I get the toe shortened but I am afraid of going under for elective surgery. They have to separate the toe at the joint, shave off bone and reattach; they won’t just shave at the tip because it could damage something. I just want to wear flip flops with pride!

Post your comments

Post Anonymously

Login

username
password
forgot password?

Register

username
password
confirm
email