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What Is Botox®?

Botox is used to help minimize the appearance of wrinkles.
The most common type of cosmetic procedure, Botox injections have been used to eliminate wrinkles.
People commonly get Botox® injections around their eyes.
Breastfeeding women should not use Botox.
Botox is injected under the skin to smooth fine lines and wrinkles.
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  • Written By: Deborah Ng
  • Edited By: Niki Foster
  • Last Modified Date: 21 October 2014
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Botox® is a protein derived from botulism toxin that is injected underneath skin in order to minimize or smooth out lines and wrinkles on the face. When low doses are used, it actually paralyzes or relaxes facial muscles, giving the recipient a clean, smooth facial appearance. Botox® is produced by Allergan Pharmaceuticals.

Treatment with Botox® has gained in popularity over the years for several reasons. It's less invasive than a face lift and the results are immediate. When one receives a facelift, he or she can expect to have bandages on the face for several days along with bruising, swelling and stitches. It might be a couple of months before the person is able to look in the mirror without seeing the effects of the plastic surgery. With Botox®, the swelling goes down within a day or two, and while a prick from the needle is visible immediately after having the injection administered, most of the evidence is gone within 24 hours.

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Botox® is also much cheaper and quicker than a face lift. In fact, it is so easy and so affordable, some people hold parties at which injections are administered to several people in the course of a couple hours. It takes such little time to administer that a patient can receive a treatment on her lunch hour. Botox® is also temporary, so if the recipient doesn't care for the way she looks, her face will resume its normal appearance within about three to six months.

Of course, there are risks. It's rare, but one can have an allergic reaction to Botox®. Also, because it numbs the muscles, it can cause the appearance of surprise or make it look like the recipient has a permanent frown. Since the treatment is temporary, these inconveniences don't last long.

Those taking antibiotics are at risk for an adverse reaction, however. Anyone who is taking an antibiotic is advised to make his or her doctor aware of this before being injected. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding are advised to postpone Botox® injections until their little ones are no longer dependent upon them for nutrition.

Botox® is a more attractive option to plastic surgery for many people. It's quick, it's less expensive, and except for the prick of a syringe, it's painless. Anyone considering cosmetic surgery may want to consider Botox® first.

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Discuss this Article

anon257360
Post 14

I had my first half of botox at age 52. I was like a lot of people: why would you want to do that, etc., etc. We have all said it, but I did it, and if I am honest, that little bit of botox is great. It's nothing major like I thought it might be, but just a little softer look, and yes there are many people out there taking in a lot more crap into their bodies than a little botox. I have changed my mine totally.

As long as it is done correctly and in small amounts.

anon190821
Post 12

I have spasmodic torticollis and have Botox injections in my neck every three or four months. There are always terrible side effects to the Botox injections. I always get sick for about a week or so.

I've been trying to stop the injections, hoping the problem will just dissolve itself. However, when my neck starts acting awful, I can't sleep because I can't even get my neck in a comfortable position. I can't sit because it must do something to my spine that affects my neck, and then I have to call for the Botox shot. I wish for another answer. I hate the shots, but I believe it's the most effective solution for my problem.

anon149005
Post 11

As long as you're not affecting anyone else/as long as no-one is harmed is all well and good but did you know that every single batch of botox is tested on animals in the most painful and hideous tests? I wouldn't have another creature's suffering on my conscience for the sake of my own vanity.

anon109776
Post 10

Do whatever makes you happy! As long as no one else is harmed and you're ok with what you're doing!

anon92484
Post 9

I have uncontrollable muscle spasms/seizures in my eyelids, left side of my face, lower jaw, and the left side and back of my neck. These are the result of relatively minor head injuries suffered in a car accident. Thanks to strategically placed botox injections every three months, I don't experience these problems and can function normally.

anon91696
Post 8

@anon10318 seriously? Comparing wrinkles to TB? Are you just a troll? TB killed an estimated 1.3 million people in 2008. How many did wrinkles kill? Perhaps you might want to reduce your botox dosage; it appears to have gotten past your face into your brains.

I have no problem with anybody who chooses to use botox on himself/herself. That's your own body, it's your prerogative. So long as you're not affecting anyone else or breaking laws, do what makes you happy. However, making ridiculous statements like that is inexcusable.

anon70028
Post 6

Different strokes for different folks. I get it injected in my face, and others eat the poison from the crap they buy in grocery stores.

If you think that you don't intake poisons on a daily basis (even via organic food) than you live in dream land.

anon37713
Post 5

"why not consider Botox first? " Because I'm happy who I am, and no one else can be me... and secondly, why on earth would they inject such poison ino the skin is beyond me!

anon10318
Post 4

Tuberculosis isn't a pleasant disease to have, yet you willingly inject newborn babies with BCG protiens don't you? BCG protects against T.B., Botulinum against wrinkling.

rjohnson
Post 3

How did we get to a point where we willingly inject posion into our face to look better? And now there are even botox parties?!

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