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What Is an "Abject Lesson"?

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  • Written By: A. Leverkuhn
  • Edited By: Andrew Jones
  • Last Modified Date: 12 October 2014
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An abject lesson is a somewhat obscure phrase used to refer to a negative use of force or authority, often a punishing action, that is distinguished by its extreme nature, and stands as a warning to those at whom it is directed. The idiom includes a somewhat figurative use of the word “lesson,” where the abject lesson is more of a blunt use of force than an actual educational initiative. The use of the word is similar to its use in the phrase “I’ll teach you a lesson,” where the speaker does not actually intend to teach, but to punish or penalize.

The phrase “abject lesson” relies on the word abject, which is fairly unfamiliar to many English speakers. This word is a general word for an extreme negative condition. For example, writers may write about “abject poverty,” which would be understood as extreme, uncompromised poverty, or “abject cowardice,” which would indicate egregious cowardice with no trace of bravery.

Another use of the word abject, which may or may not relate to the phrase “abject lesson” is its use in referring to a fallen state. For example, epic poets of the past may have used this word in reference to the “Fall from Heaven” and in describing a degraded or impaired nature. In the use of the abject lesson, it is most often the former meaning of the word abject that is utilized.

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Many speakers confuse the phrase “abject lesson” with a very similar phrase “object lesson.” Although some may claim that these two are the same, the object lesson is commonly defined as something very different. An object lesson can be an actual educational lesson, where a physical object is used as a metaphor for a philosophical, sociological, or other intangible idea or process.

In many English speaking societies, the term abject lesson has always been relatively obscure. Many of today’s native English speakers may never have even heard of this term, replacing it with more common synonyms or variants. Most commonly, the phrasal verb “crack down” has a similar meaning, indicating a harsher response to a behavior that is intended to set an example for a target population. The phrase “make an example out of” someone is also a useful and more common form of this idea.

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