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What Is a Wired Home Network?

A wired router can be used to set up a home network.
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  • Written By: Charity Delich
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 13 October 2014
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    Conjecture Corporation
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A wired home network is a physical system that allows multiple home computers to talk with each another. Wired home networking is usually accomplished by using cables and other hardware to connect one computer to another. Once the network has been installed, users within the network can share computer files and documents as well as printers and scanners. In addition, home networks allow multiple computers to tap into the same Internet connection and to use the system for playing games or music and for watching videos.

In order to set up a wired home network, there must be at least two home computers that will be part of the network. These computers will be connected using special cables that are designed to physically link one computer to another. A wired home network usually requires software to help manage data exchanges and file sharing. This software is often automatically included with the computers’ operating systems.

In addition, a network requires the installation of basic home network hardware, such as a router. A router is a physical gadget that is used to support file and connection sharing from one computer to another. It is required regardless of whether the network will have access to the Internet or not. If the network will be connected to the Internet, a modem will also need to be installed. Via the cables, the router will link the network computers to the modem, and the modem will then allow the computers to access the Internet.

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A wired home network is distinct from a wireless network. A wireless network works by using radio waves instead of cables to connect one home computer to another. Wireless networks are growing in popularity because of their convenience and mobility.

Wired home networking can have a number of advantages over a wireless home network configuration. Typically, wired networks offer greater security and more protection from data hacking. In addition, they usually run faster, allowing users to move large files around more quickly.

There can be some disadvantages to using this type of home network. For instance, the cables used to connect the network computers are typically installed inside the walls of a house. Installation of these cables can be expensive, particularly if there are multiple computers within the network. A wired network can also hinder mobility. For example, laptop users will not be able to move their computers from room to room within a house unless a plug-in cable is available.

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everetra
Post 2

@Charred - I set up a wireless network in my home. The basic concepts are the same as described here, minus the cables. I have the cable modem hooked up to the wireless router, which transmits the signal.

Yes, I do get interference from time to time from other devices, and about once every 6 months I have to reset my modem. I think you have to do this anyway even without the network.

Also, I have to administer the network from a web page. However, you can’t beat the mobility. I can move anywhere I want throughout the house with my laptop, and as you mentioned, it’s convenient when guests bring their laptops over, they can just log on to your network.

Charred
Post 1

I used to have a wireless computer network but switched to wiring a home network for a number of reasons, the biggest of which was reliability. I have a more reliable connection with my wired connection because I don’t have to worry about a wireless router having a hiccup now and then.

Performance is another reason too. I set myself up with Fast Ethernet and that gives me a potential speed of 100 Mbps, much higher than most wireless systems which top out at 54Mbps.

The only disadvantage of this system is when

guests come over and sometimes bring their laptops. They assume that I have a wireless network they can “hop on” to. Of course, that’s a non-starter. But if there are nearby wireless networks in the neighborhood they can use those instead.

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