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What is a Tartlet Tin?

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  • Written By: A Kaminsky
  • Edited By: Niki Foster
  • Last Modified Date: 29 July 2014
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When a large pie is too much food, or when a cook wants small, elegant servings, he or she may want a tartlet tin. A tartlet is a small version of a tart — that is, a pie without a top crust. A tartlet tin, then, is a small pan in which the tartlet is baked.

A tartlet tin may have straight or slightly slanted sides. Most of the time, these sides are fluted, although some may be smooth for a different look. A tartlet tin may also come in varying sizes, from those small enough to hold only a half-teaspoon or so of filling, to those large enough to make small pies — about four inches (10.1 centimeters) across. A cook using a tartlet tin may want to make small pies, quiches, hors d’oeuvres, petits fours and a variety of other sweet or savory snacks. Some recipes are especially for use with a tartlet tin, while others must be modified.

The tartlet tin may be made of a variety of materials. Some are made of real tin plate, while others are made of aluminum bakeware, copper or non-stick materials. Most of the time, tartlet tins are sold in groups of different sizes, and sometimes, in different shapes, such as square, round and oval. All are safe for oven use.

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Using a tartlet tin is not difficult — it simply requires a different technique than a larger pan. Since most tartlet tins are quite small, the cook cannot place them on the oven rack. Instead, he will generally put the tins on a cookie sheet to bake them.

The cook must also carefully watch the tartlets. The extra thickness of metal on the bottom may mean a longer cooking time, but it also means the tartlets will brown more quickly, so the cook has to time the baking with precision. This is the time to carry the kitchen timer in a pocket! Because the cooking technique is different when using a tartlet tin, the cook may want to make a small, simple recipe to practice using the tins. This will enable him to learn how a tartlet tin bakes in his particular oven, since ovens vary.

The tartlet tin is available nearly everywhere cooking supplies are sold. For special shapes or sizes, the cook will probably need to visit a specialty kitchen store. The tartlet tin is sold in sets, starting at about 5 US dollars (USD).

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Discuss this Article

ellafarris
Post 3

@Sierra02 - I don't know if this is the correct temperature to use for all of your fillings, but I baked some little pear filled tarts once at four hundred degrees for twenty-five minutes tops. They turned out so delicious. The fruit was hot and tender and the crusts were a beautiful golden brown.

If that temperature doesn't feel right to you then you might consider visiting a cake decorating shop. Not only do they have tons of decorating supplies but they usually carry specialty cookbooks and magazines as well.

goldensky
Post 2

@Sierra02 - It's difficult to give you an exact temperature modification and time for baking the tarts since both the ingredients and ovens vary so greatly.

A good rule of thumb is to keep the temperature the same but watch them very carefully every few minutes. They will likely be done well before the actual recipe recommends.

Someone who has more experience with baking individual mini cakes might have a better answer with an exact time. Good luck on your party.

Sierra02
Post 1

I received a set of eight mini tartlet tins a while back from my aunt but I have not used them yet. They're so tiny and adorable.

I'll be hosting an upcoming bridal shower for my husband's younger sister and I thought these little fluted tins would make some wonderful bite-sized desserts.

I plan to use a variety of fruit pie fillings like apple/pear, peach/blueberry, cherry and strawberry/rhubarb, these are some of my mothers recipes.

I am curious though how to adjust the temperature when baking them. Does anyone know how long I should cook them for and at what temperature? Thanks in advance.

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