Category: 

What Is a Personal Trainer Waiver?

Personal trainers might lead workouts at resorts.
Personal trainers have their clients sign waivers to provide protection against liabilities from training.
Most personal training programs are not dangerous, as they are designed for the client, but a waiver is still required just in case of an accident.
Article Details
  • Written By: Esther Ejim
  • Edited By: Kaci Lane Hindman
  • Last Modified Date: 29 September 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2014
    Conjecture Corporation
  • Print this Article
Free Widgets for your Site/Blog
Coloring your hair in the ‘30s often came with swollen eyelids, blisters and headaches.  more...

October 21 ,  1879 :  Thomas Edison lit up a light bulb for the first time.  more...

A personal trainer waiver is a form that a personal trainer must give to prospective clients to fill out and sign as a protection against any potential liabilities from the training program. The main reason why a personal trainer waiver is important is because personal training carries with it some inherent risks and dangers, which may result in some of form of inadvertent injury to the trainee. In anticipation of the possibility of such an occurrence, the personal trainer must obtain the consent of the trainee or client to begin the training program.

Most personal trainers will not train anyone without obtaining a personal trainer waiver — not even close friends and family. In highly litigious societies, this is not only prudent but required by insurance companies as part of the contract between a personal trainer and any type of client. That is not to say that personal training programs are dangerous since most personal trainers are professionals who design training programs to fit the client. Even though most clients are required to fill out their medical histories as part of the contract, some clients may have some hidden conditions that could put them at a risk during the training process.

Ad

For instance, a client might have an undetected congenital heart defect that may increase the risk of getting a heart attack. In a situation like this, the client may suffer a heart attack by the exertions brought on by the training process. The personal trainer waiver would protect the personal trainer from any liability that might flow from such a situation. Other instances of injury may be attributed to accidents that could occur during the personal training process. Such injuries include accidents like slips and falls.

Basically, the personal trainer waiver contains several sections that the client must read and agree to before the training can commence. One of the sections usually contains an explanation of the dangers associated with the personal training process, which requires the client to show in writing that he or she has been informed of the possible dangers but still consents to the personal training. Another section allows the client to state that he or she is participating in the personal training program by free will. Other sections contain an agreement by the client to release the trainer from any liability due to the training program and a personal assumption of the risk associated with the training. The client must also sign and date the personal trainer waiver.

Ad

More from Wisegeek

You might also Like

Discuss this Article

anon942150
Post 1

Does this injury waiver protect them completely? I started PT and on my fourth session or so was given a suspect exercise and subsequently injured. I've now been out of action for 14 months, can no longer lift weights, do many day to day activities and ruled out many of my hobbies because of this (not to mention the way it has affected my general well-being).

I have seen five specialists, and surgery is my next step, and there is no guarantee it will fix the issue, and it could lead to a whole lot of further surgery should it worsen the condition. I've been told my wrists may never be the same again, even if I have 'successful' surgery. My predominant hand has torn TFCC and ECU Subluxation/Subsheath tear, left wrist has just the ECU issues. I can no longer bare any weight on my wrists/hands, have trouble picking things up, have continued to work but sometimes it becomes difficult (If I was in a more manual labour type job I could not work). I would love to see what anyone thinks. I haven't pressed the issue with the PT besides explaining the injury to him and canceling all my sessions.

Post your comments

Post Anonymously

Login

username
password
forgot password?

Register

username
password
confirm
email