Category: 

What Is a Microphone Jack?

Article Details
  • Written By: C. Mitchell
  • Edited By: John Allen
  • Last Modified Date: 03 December 2016
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2016
    Conjecture Corporation
  • Print this Article
Free Widgets for your Site/Blog
President Richard Nixon had an entire speech prepared in case the Apollo 11 astronauts became stranded on the Moon.  more...

December 8 ,  1965 :  Pope Paul VI promulgated Vatican II into ecumenical law.  more...

A microphone jack is a small round outlet, usually on a computer, camcorder, or stereo, into which a microphone cord is plugged. The jack, sometimes called a mic jack, is an input connector that works much like an electrical socket. Plugging a microphone into a jack enables it to send its sound into the computer or other device.

In home filming and recording endeavors, microphones are more often than not plugged into machines, such as computers, that can store and edit the sound. The microphone jack is how the microphone's cable or cord connects to this technology. Once the microphone is plugged in, the computer, stereo, or other device is able to receive and translate the mic input. This input can then be converted into audio files or editable recordings.

Most of the time, a headphone jack can double as a microphone jack. So long as a port is designed for converting audio signals, it can typically be used for any sort of audio equipment, microphones included. Audio jacks are commonplace on most modern electronics, including stereos, karaoke machines, smartphones, and both laptop and desktop computers.

When an audio port is not readily available, a microphone jack adapter may be required. A jack adapter converts some other input source into an audio port. Most adapters use universal serial bus (USB) ports.

Ad

Just because a microphone has a cable does not necessarily mean that it will fit into a given microphone jack. Jacks typically range from 2.5 to 3.5 millimeters (about 0.10 to 0.13 inches) in diameter. Microphone cables are less uniform. Some are designed to fit into jacks, but others are designed to fit into more traditional XLR connections.

An XLR connection is the standard connection for most professional-grade audio equipment, including amplifiers and synthesizers. These kinds of connections are characterized by multiple prongs, usually between three and seven. The prongs fit into dedicated XLR jacks.

One of the biggest benefits of the XLR jack is its stability. With multiple prongs, the cable is more secure, and less likely to come loose inadvertently. It is rare for a computer or other mainstream electronic device to have an XLR input, however. In order to connect a microphone to a standard microphone jack, an XLR adapter may be required.

XLR adapters work just like traditional microphone jack adapters. They usually have an XLR receiver on one end, and a jack input plug on the other. Once the XLR end is snapped into the microphone cable, the microphone can be plugged into the jack.

Ad

You might also Like

Recommended

Discuss this Article

OeKc05
Post 3

@orangey03 – It probably will. I would definitely try it before I went out and bought a microphone jack for my computer.

I used to record myself singing to music using nothing but a microphone and a tape recorder. Luckily, the jack worked with my mic.

I didn't have access to any fancy effects or any editing software, but it accomplished the purpose I had in mind. I just wanted to know whether or not I could actually sing, and this simple method was enough for that.

orangey03
Post 2

I don't have a computer with a microphone jack, but I've been wanting to find a way to record myself singing. I have an old tape deck with a headphone jack. Would that work as a microphone jack?

StarJo
Post 1

My uncle has a mixing board with several microphone jacks. I played in a band with him, and I had to adjust the sound and levels at times.

I remember having to follow the microphone cable all the way to the jack to see whose mic was plugged into which one. Then, I would adjust the highs and lows, as well as the volume, as the person sang or talked into the microphone.

Post your comments

Post Anonymously

Login

username
password
forgot password?

Register

username
password
confirm
email