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What is a Maroon-Bellied Conure?

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  • Written By: K. Gierok
  • Edited By: John Allen
  • Last Modified Date: 25 October 2016
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Often confused with the green-cheeked conure, the maroon-bellied conure is a type of bird that is native to South America, residing specifically in Paraguay and Uruguay, though it can survive in a range from southeast Brazil though northern Argentina. Like most other types of conures, the maroon-bellied conure has feathers that are mostly green, though as the name of the bird suggests, it has a patch of maroon on its belly. In addition, the bird typically has a yellowish-green chest—often referred to as being "scaly"—with a patch of brown over its ears and a black beak. The maroon-bellied conure is a relatively small bird in contrast to other types of conures, with a length of approximately 9 to 10 inches (23-25 cm).

Though maroon-bellied conures were once considered rare as pets, their reputation as happy birds increased their popularity. Most maroon bellied-conures can live to the age of around 35, though they can be used for breeding purposes at ages as young as three. As for diet, maroon-bellied conures prefer a good-quality seed mix and a daily meal of fruits and vegetables. The low cost of acquiring a maroon bellied conure also makes them an attractive choice for many bird lovers.

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One of the reasons why the maroon-bellied conure is popular is due to the fact that they are easily trained to talk. While these birds can learn to speak hundreds of different words, they can sometimes be hard to distinguish. Maroon-bellied conures express themselves best with their natural shrills and screams. While the maroon-bellied conure is quieter than other types of similar birds, it can still make plenty of noise, a fact that should be considered carefully if the owner lives in an apartment building, condominium, or other location where neighbors may be subjected to the bird's noises.

Finally, like most other types of conures, maroon-bellied conures are social creatures that love interacting with both their human and bird families. If a person is considering adopting or purchasing a maroon-bellied conure, that person should make sure that he or she has plenty of time to devote to the creature each day. While conures do not require huge amounts of grooming, exercise, or other care, they must have adequate amounts of interaction. If the bird is neglected, it can develop habits that are dangerous to the bird and disruptive to the owners.

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