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What Is a Fuyu Persimmon?

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  • Written By: Britt Archer
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 21 November 2016
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A fuyu persimmon is a tasty and nutritious fruit that was so valued by the people of ancient Greece that they dubbed it “the food of the gods.” That is a pretty potent label for a mere fruit, but people who have come to love the fuyu persimmon say it has earned the moniker because of its rich sweetness. Many types of persimmons are available, but the fuyu has its own distinct attributes, including the heady sweetness that is present to different degrees when it is both ripe and not fully ripened. Other varieties of persimmon fruit are not nearly as sweet before they are fully ripe and have been known to make a taster’s mouth pucker because of their astringency.

The size of the fuyu persimmon is similar to a very small pumpkin or miniature gourd, and it can fit in an adult’s palm. The orange fruit grows well in warmer regions, but other areas with colder climates must import the fuyu.

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The fuyu persimmon was originally found in China, where it grew for centuries, and it went on to become popular with farmers in Japan, where the persimmon is known as kaki. Its popularity spread across the Pacific Ocean when the fruit was introduced to Californians in the 19th century. Farmers today grow it in a number of places around the world. It is still a valuable fruit crop in China and Japan, and it also is grown commercially in Israel, Brazil and Korea. The Israelis have given it the name “Sharon fruit.”

An average-size fuyu persimmon contains about 120 calories and it has very little fat content. It is rich in fiber, antioxidants, manganese and vitamin A. The fruit also is a good source of calcium, potassium, vitamin C and several B vitamins. The fuyu can be enjoyed fresh and plain or cooked, and it can be used to sweeten smoothies. In China, the fuyu is also eaten dried, which gives it a candy-like flavor. Some people even poach the fuyu, and others make persimmon pudding, while some cooks like to include persimmons in fruit salad, artichoke salad, black bean salad, cranberry sauce, chutney, couscous salad, bundt cakes, salsa and spinach salad.

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stoneMason
Post 3

@turquoise-- What color are they? Fuyu are yellow to light orange in color. Other types of persimmon are slightly oval but Fuyu tends to be flat on the bottom. It much looks like a tomato shape wise. You can eat a Fuyu when it's firm. It doesn't need to ripen all the way. It's not astringent, so yes, if you've got Fuyu persimmon, your mouth won't pucker. If it does pucker, you've got something else, possibly Hachiya (Japanese persimmon) or cinnamon persimmon which is a type of Hachiya.

I actually also think that some of these varieties have been crossbred. I ate a persimmon once which looked exactly like a Fuyu but the flesh was gelatinous like a Hachiya. Normally, Hachiyas are oval, blood orange and gelatinous. Fuyu are flat on the bottom, light orange and crisp. So I have no idea what I ate but I assume that it was a cross-bred of the two.

turquoise
Post 2

My husband brought some persimmon home from the store but he has no idea what type they are. I'm assuming they're Fuyu but I'm not sure. They're not all the way ripe yet and they're not too large or too small. Does this sound like Fuyu? And is Fuyu the best type?

I can't wait till they're all the way ripe to taste them. But should I try one now to see if my mouth puckers? Because if it doesn't, it has to be Fuyu right?

fify
Post 1

Fuyu persimmon in Turkey goes by the name of "heaven fruit." It's obvious that Fuyu persimmons are deemed just as great and delicious now as it was during the time of the ancient Greeks.

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