Category: 

What Is a Chicken Allergy?

Throat and eye discomfort in the presence of chicken may be signs of a chicken allergy.
Some people cannot be exposed to chicken.
Food allergies may manifest as skin rashes.
Article Details
  • Written By: J.M. Willhite
  • Edited By: Heather Bailey
  • Last Modified Date: 12 November 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2014
    Conjecture Corporation
  • Print this Article
Free Widgets for your Site/Blog
The US Post Office uses a mail boat to deliver to other ships on the Detroit River, and it has its own zip code: 48222.  more...

November 27 ,  1978 :  Harvey Milk and San Francisco Mayor George Moscone were murdered.  more...

A chicken allergy is an exaggerated, immuno-response to the body’s exposure to chicken. Like any other allergy, exposure to the pathogen, in this case chicken, causes an adverse effect initiated by the body’s overproduction of histamine. Although avoidance of the offending allergen is best, treatment for a chicken allergy may involve the use of various medications to reduce irritation.

Diagnosing a chicken allergy involves a comprehensive review of symptoms coupled with a complete physical examination. Confirming a diagnosis is generally quite easy if the trigger is obvious, such as if the individual only becomes ill when he or she consumes chicken or is in close contact with live chickens. If there is any doubt as to what may be triggering one’s allergy attacks, he or she may undergo a blood panel and allergy testing.

The immune system of someone with a chicken allergy essentially classifies the chicken-related substance as a pathogen, or irritant. Accordingly, to eliminate the offending pathogen, the immune system increases histamine and antibody production. In some instances, the body’s response can become so intense it places the individual at risk for potentially fatal complications, including anaphylaxis and death.

Ad

As occurs with most allergies, the body’s immuno-response to a pathogen occurs within a short time of initial exposure. Depending on the severity of one’s allergy, a variety of symptoms may occur. Some people may immediately experience tell-tale watery eyes, runny nose, and sneezing with exposure to a single chicken feather. Others may experience a more adverse reaction that presents as a skin rash or hives, abdominal discomfort, or difficulty breathing after consuming chicken meat. Additional signs of a chicken allergy can include eye swelling and throat discomfort that may range from scratchy to sore.

If one’s chicken allergy is severe enough, he or she may go into anaphylactic shock. Light-headedness, airway constriction, and elevated heart rate are common signs of anaphylactic shock. Considered an emergency situation, anaphylaxis can progress rapidly, causing one to lose consciousness. If treatment is delayed or absent, anaphylactic shock can be fatal.

The best treatment for a chicken allergy is avoiding chicken altogether. When avoidance isn’t feasible, there are measures that can be taken to alleviate or at least lessen the intensity of one’s allergic reaction. Individuals with a mild allergy can often find relief with the use of an over-the-counter (OTC) antihistamine, like Benedryl. Those with a more intense chicken allergy may have to carry an injection device filled with a single dose of epinephrine or an inhaler with them at all times.

Ad

More from Wisegeek

You might also Like

Discuss this Article

Rotergirl
Post 2

I have a friend whose Yorkshire terrier is allergic to chicken. It gives him seizures. She had to put him on a special food that doesn't have any kind of chicken products in it. She has to get this food that has what they call "alternate proteins," like duck and lamb. She has to be really careful if she and her husband have chicken for supper because Boo-Boo loves chicken and will get into it if they don't watch him closely.

Not long ago, he got into some chicken and his mom came into the room and saw him seizing. She had to take him to the vet, and he was all right, but it certainly gave her a scare.

Pippinwhite
Post 1

I don't think I've ever known anyone who had an allergy to chicken. Red food coloring, peanuts, yes. Chicken? Nope.

I imagine having a chicken allergy would just about prompt someone to go vegan. Chicken protein is in so many things.

At least it's easier to be vegan or vegetarian these days, with so many meat substitutes available, and other forms of protein being for sale in the supermarkets. You can really do better these days than you could even five years ago or so. There's a really great chicken substitute on the market that cooks very quickly, and it really does taste just like chicken.

Post your comments

Post Anonymously

Login

username
password
forgot password?

Register

username
password
confirm
email