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What is a Carpet Beater?

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  • Written By: J.E. Holloway
  • Edited By: M. C. Hughes
  • Last Modified Date: 26 November 2016
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A carpet beater, also known as a rug beater, is a tool used to clean carpets and rugs. The carpet beater consists of a long handle with a broad, flat head, which often has a pleated or knot-like design. To make use of a carpet beater, the user hangs a carpet or rug from a laundry line or over a fence and vigorously strikes it repeatedly with the carpet beater, loosening dust and dirt.

Carpet beaters are usually made of wood, rattan, wicker, or cane. Some models, particularly those manufactured in the late 20th century, may also be made of wire, metal, or plastic. They became common in the 19th century, as mass production lowered the prices of carpets and rugs enough so that many families could afford them. Carpet beaters were common household tools even into the middle of the 20th century, when they began to be replaced by carpet sweepers and increasingly affordable vacuum cleaners.

As a cleaning tool, carpet beaters are inexpensive and environmentally friendly. Compared to vacuum cleaners, however, they have some drawbacks. For example, rugs must be taken outdoors to be beaten. In Britain and the Netherlands, carpet beating was traditionally done in the back yard of a house, so cleaning could only be done in good weather. In the case of houses without yards, carpets were hung out of windows to be beaten, which could be unpleasant for passers-by, who would have to walk through a cloud of dust and dirt.

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Although they are no longer commonly used for their original purpose, antique rug beaters can be collectors' items. Some carpet beaters have intricately patterned heads, and these became popular ornaments in the late 20th century, often hung on walls in pairs or groups. Some carpet beaters designed for the collectors' market have decorative heads shaped like animals, hearts, or other designs. These are popular for decoration, but were not common in functional carpet beaters. Replica carpet beaters can be found online and in many stores, and authentic carpet beaters, which were once ubiquitous in households, are comparatively affordable antiques.

In the Netherlands, the carpet beater (known as a 'mattenklopper') was customarily used for corporal punishment. Children were spanked using the carpet beater's broad, flat, paddle-like head. Carpet beaters and punishment are so associated in Dutch culture that the carpet beater remains a symbol of discipline, authority, and traditional values. It is associated with the stereotypical figure of a controlling, efficient mother and housewife.

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anon952242
Post 11

There is one thing that all the posters have forgotten to discuss. There has never been a carpet sweeper or vacuum ever sold that can compare to the effectiveness and thoroughness of a carpet beater. A carpet beater removes significantly more dirt, sand and dust while electric cleaners remove only surface items.

I am a carpet installer, so you cannot lie to or fool me. A beater is efficient, thorough, inexpensive, and inconvenient for the lazy.

A vacuum: inefficient, but quickly makes the carpet look clean (if all you care about is looks), expensive and easy for the lazy.

Just because your vacuum picks up a whole lot of stuff, that only means that there is five times that amount still in the carpet that hasn't been removed.

Think washing or professionally cleaning it is better? Each cleaning reduces its life 10-20 percent, but if you have loads of money you don't care about waste. In this case it's clear. Lazy versus smart.

Monika
Post 10

It's interesting how certain things have cultural relevance in different countries. When I think of a carpet beater, I definitely don't think of it as an implement for corporal punishment. I simply think of it as an old fashioned household implement. However, I'm not from the Netherlands!

I don't think we have the same tradition of using a carpet beater for corporal punishment in the United States. However, I know many people associate wooden spoons with corporal punishment! My parents never used a wooden spoon on me or my sister, but I have quite a few friends that remember being spanked with a wooden spoon as a child.

SZapper
Post 9

@indemnifyme - I can see someone wanting to use a carpet beater on residential carpet because of tradition. A lot of families save household implements like that and pass it down from generation to generation.

Plus, a carpet beater could definitely be decorative. I have a friend that has her home decorated in kind of a country style, and she keeps her carpet beater right next to her fireplace. It looks like it belongs there, and the carpet beater itself has a very intricate design.

That being said, I don't know if she ever uses it to actually clean her carpets though.

indemnifyme
Post 8

I think at this point carpet beaters are a thing of the past. I've never known anyone who owns one, or seen one sold in a store. To be honest, I don't really see the point these days.

There are so many products available to clean home carpet that work much better than a carpet beater ever could. There are fancy vacuum cleaners with a lot of attachments and HEPA filters. And smaller sweepers if you just want to quickly go over your rug. And of course there's a variety of foams and powders you can put on your rug to help get dirt out.

Why would anyone want to use a carpet beater?

orangey03
Post 7

@lighth0se33 - Do you ever go to the beach? If you have sandy towels, nothing does a better job of getting them clean than a rug beater.

I have tried vacuuming and violently shaking beach towels when I return home, but some sand always stays behind. My friend let me use her carpet beater on one, and I was amazed at how much sand I was able to beat out of it. It got it all out.

This works for picnic blankets, too. Even if you only picnic on regular dirt and grass, a carpet beater will effectively clean it.

lighth0se33
Post 6

I have a wire carpet beater that was given to me as a wedding gift. It reminds me of a whisk, because the wire is twisted together in a three-dimensional way, and since whisks are used to beat things, I’m pretty sure it would work well.

The problem is that I don’t have any rugs. I want to put this thing to good use, because right now, it is just an ornament hanging from a nail on my wall in the den. Can anyone think of some other things I could use my carpet beater for?

cloudel
Post 5

My friend had a huge rug that he used a carpet beater to clean, but that all changed when he moved to upstate New York. The winters were so bitterly cold and riddled with blizzards that he had to resort to vacuuming until warmer weather.

His carpet beater was passed down to him by his grandparents. It was made of wicker, and it was fashioned into a large Celtic knot at the end.

It looked beautiful, but it could sure whip the dirt out of a rug. Since it only gets used during the warm months now, maybe it will last longer, and he can pass it on to his kids.

kylee07drg
Post 4

Just reading about carpet beaters makes me sneeze! I have severe allergies to dust and pet dander, so I have hardwood floors in my home.

I do have rugs in front of the doors to wipe my feet on, and I vacuum them every week. However, my husband will periodically take them outside and shake them hard. He probably could use a carpet beater with no problem!

I walked by my neighbor’s house while she was using a big wooden carpet beater, and she looked like she was really enjoying taking out her aggression on the rug. The dust really got to me. I had to go home and take an antihistamine!

summing
Post 3

I live out in the country and have only a few rugs in my house and I always use a carpet beater to get them clean. It just makes sense because it is such a small job, but I have also found that this is one of the best ways to get pet hair out of your rugs and carpets. Vacuums work, sure, but they always seem to leave at least a few lingering hairs. A carpet beater, when used properly, can restore your rugs to their level of cleanliness on day one.

truman12
Post 2

Does anyone actually use carpet beaters these days? It seems like vacuums and carpet sweepers are so common and cheap to buy that no one would have any incentive to use carpet beaters these days.

Also, what about new carpet that can't be removed from the home? With this stuff you have no choice but to use a vacuum.

chivebasil
Post 1

My grandmother had a legendary carpet beater. It was her ritual every month for most of her life to beat the carpets out one a month. She would do it in her front yard and it was kind of like a neighborhood show.

She had all her rugs strung up and she would go to beating on them and before you know it there was a cloud of dust hanging over her house like a mushroom cloud. It was quite a sight to see but you had to hand it to her, she had some of the cleanest rugs on the block.

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