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What is a Candy Thermometer?

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  • Last Modified Date: 19 November 2014
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A candy thermometer is a type of large, glass mercury thermometer that measures candy syrups during cooking. It does for sugar what a meat thermometer does for meats, with the only difference being that the candy thermometer can read higher levels of temperature. In general, it's designed to measure temperatures as low as 40°F (about 4.4°C) and as high as 400°F (about 204.4°C).

Using this thermometer involves placing it in a standing or hanging position in a pan while the sugar is cooking. When using a candy thermometer, the bulb part of the instrument should not touch the bottom of the pan. If it does, the thermometer will yield a very high temperature rating.

There are several candy thermometer styles to choose from. One of the older styles comes with a liquid-based feature. Another has a digital display. With this type of thermometer, the chef can identify the various stages of sugar when heated. These include sugar soft-ball, soft crack, hard crack, very hard ball, thread and caramelized sugar. Each stage of the sugar cooking process is shown next to its appropriate temperature.

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The rectangular metal candy thermometer is favored by most in the culinary field. A rectangular thermometer is encased in a matching metal frame designed to prevent the bulb from touching the bottom of the pan. If this type slips into the pan and the bulb touches the base, it does not display a reading. This helps ensure the proper reading is measured every time.

A candy thermometer is a vital tool in candy making. This is because of the precise timing necessary during the cooking period. With it, one can ensure a certain type of consistency at the end of the candy making process. Without it, the candy may crumble too easily, crack, or otherwise fail to hold its proper shape.

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yournamehere
Post 5

OK candy-savvy people, I need some advice. I'm looking into buying a candy thermometer, but I don't know which one I should get.

The ones in my local store are by Maverick, Taylor, and CDN.

So which one should I go for -- the Maverick candy thermometer, the Taylor candy thermometer, or the CDN candy thermometer?

I'm kind of thinking the CDN just because I like the way it looks, but I really have no idea what I'm doing here. Do any of you own one of these things, or could you tell me which one I should get?

googlefanz
Post 4

If you do a lot of candy making you may want to invest in a digital candy thermometer. I know when I first started using a candy thermometer I found it infuriatingly difficult to read the lines -- though perhaps I had a wonky thermometer, who knows.

Anyway, I am definitely glad that I got a digital thermometer, because it just makes the whole process so much easier. Now I couldn't even imagine making candy without a digital thermometer!

CopperPipe
Post 3

Very interesting. I always read about how you need a candy making thermometer if you're going to make any kind of candy at home, but I always ended up making my microwave fudge candy without a thermometer.

Now I'm starting to get into some more complicated types of candy and I was considering buying a nice candy thermometer.

Thanks for telling me kind of the basics of what a candy thermometer does, and what I should look for in a good one.

Thanks a lot, wisegeek!

anon29972
Post 1

Any idea what liquid is inside the thermometer? eg. alcohol or mercury?

Ours is blue.

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