Category: 

What is a Building Implosion?

Article Details
  • Written By: Dan Cavallari
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 02 November 2016
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2016
    Conjecture Corporation
  • Print this Article
Free Widgets for your Site/Blog
A recent study suggests that former acne sufferers are more likely to retain a youthful appearance as they age.  more...

December 9 ,  1979 :  The eradication of smallpox was certified.  more...

A building implosion is a process of demolishing a building or structure using strategically placed explosives that allow the structure to fall in on itself rather than outward or sideways, consequently damaging surrounding structures. A building implosion is not a true implosion; it is instead a controlled explosion that reduces the building structure to rubble in only a few seconds, avoiding a deconstruction process that could otherwise take months or even years. Many urban areas will play host to a building implosion to keep buildings that need to be demolished from damaging surrounding buildings or taking too much time to be removed from valuable real estate.

The process of executing a building implosion can be very difficult and needs to be performed by experienced professionals. The explosives used in the building implosion must be placed strategically within the building to damage structural joints and supports in just the right way at just the right time. The preparation time for a building implosion event can take anywhere from a few hours to several months; larger buildings must often be gutted properly, and many walls and other structures within the building must first be removed before the implosion can take place. Glass windows and other objects that may lead to excessive debris are very often removed from the building before the implosion takes place.

Ad

On the day of a building implosion, the immediate vicinity of the building is usually cordoned off, and bystanders are not allowed in the immediate area of the building. This is done to prevent injury should the implosion go wrong, but it is also done to prevent people from inhaling dangerous dust and particles. Clearing the area of bystanders also allows the explosive experts to have plenty of room to do the job properly without risk of outside interference. In many cases, a building implosion draws large crowds who hope to catch a glimpse of the spectacular event.

Implosions can go wrong if explosives are set incorrectly or if unforeseen conditions affect the process. Debris can be hurled significant distances, potentially leading to injuries or structural damage to surrounding buildings. If the implosion fails, the building may need to be demolished manually, which can be expensive, time-consuming, and dangerous. These instances are not common, as most implosions are successful, but in the event of a failed implosion, significant care must be taken to demolish the rest of the building carefully, and precautions need to be taken against injury or unintended collapse.

Ad

You might also Like

Recommended

Discuss this Article

Post your comments

Post Anonymously

Login

username
password
forgot password?

Register

username
password
confirm
email