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What Does It Mean to Be "in the Saddle"?

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  • Written By: Jim B.
  • Edited By: M. C. Hughes
  • Last Modified Date: 04 December 2016
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Someone who is said to be "in the saddle" is in a position of control or command over a situation. It is an English idiom that can also be used when describing someone who is in a comfortable situation with which he or she is extremely familiar. In addition, this phrase has many variations, including the very popular "back in the saddle." The meaning of the phrase comes from the fact that the saddle is the place where a person sits when riding on top of a horse.

There are specific occasions that arise when a speaker needs to use phrases that have a little more color and spice than what might be accomplished by using very literal wordplay. Idioms are very useful in achieving such expressiveness. An idiom is a short phrase that has gained a meaning, through popular usage, that might be different from what it once meant when it was first coined. It may even have a meaning different that the literal definitions of the words that it contains. One such idiom that relates to riding horses is the phrase "in the saddle."

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If someone is described in this manner, it means that the person has achieved some measure of control over a situation. It could mean that the person is in a position of supervision over other people. In addition, it could also signify that the person has no worries about what is going on because of his or her adeptness in handling the situation at hand. As an example, imagine the sentence, "I was worried at first about how we could get this job done, but it felt good to have a leader like him in the saddle."

In addition, it is possible for this phrase to be used in conjunction with a person who has reached a level of comfort in whatever he or she is doing. People described in this way might not necessarily be in charge, but they could be doing something that they have been doing for a long time. For example, imagine the sentence, "It felt good after such a long time away to get back in my favorite car; it was like I was in the saddle again."

People often use the similar phrase "back in the saddle" when someone is returning to a position of comfort after a long time away. The meaning of the phrase comes from the fact that a rider sits on a saddle aboard a horse. That person is generally in control of the horse, so someone who merits use of this idiomatic expression is in control of a situation.

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