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What does an Assault Attorney do?

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  • Written By: N. Madison
  • Edited By: Jenn Walker
  • Last Modified Date: 30 October 2016
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An assault attorney works on legal cases involving assault. This type of attorney may seek justice for a person who has been an assault victim, or he may work to defend someone accused of committing assault. His job may include such tasks as interviewing prospective clients and preparing them for trials, interviewing witnesses, researching cases, and preparing for court. A person in this position may also seek out and review crime documentation for the purpose of learning the facts involved in the case. When an assault attorney represents a plaintiff, he may seek the most severe sentencing for the defendant; a defense attorney, on the other hand, will usually try to secure the least severe punishment for his client.

Many people have a good idea of what an assault attorney does in a courtroom, but may be unsure of what he does behind the scenes. A person in this position has the job of interviewing clients and learning the facts of a case from their point of view. Then, he’ll typically work to get details from a legal prospective by obtaining police reports and other official documents. With this documentation at hand, he may have a better understanding of the events involved and find it easier to separate the facts from opinion and misstatements.

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Often, an assault attorney also works to prepare his client and other parties for court. He may advise his client on how to conduct himself and even on how to dress. He may also interview witnesses and prepare them for testifying in court. For example, he may warn witnesses about what to expect from the opposing attorney and advise them to answer clearly without providing extra information. Sometimes this sort of preparation may help witnesses and clients to feel less nervous in court and avoid making case-damaging blunders.

Once in court, an assault attorney’s job is usually to argue his case on behalf of the plaintiff or the defendant. He will usually seek to convince a judge or a jury that the defendant in the case is either guilty or not guilty. In some cases, however, he may work to negotiate a deal rather than waiting to see what verdict will be returned. For example, an assault attorney who is working for a defendant may recommend that his client pleads guilty to assault or a less serious crime if it means he may receive a lighter punishment.

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