Category: 

What Are the Effects of Too Much Cortisol?

Article Details
  • Written By: H. Colledge
  • Edited By: Heather Bailey
  • Last Modified Date: 01 December 2016
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2016
    Conjecture Corporation
  • Print this Article
Free Widgets for your Site/Blog
Snake charmers get snakes to “dance” because of the movement of their flute-like instruments, not their music.  more...

December 4 ,  1945 :  The United States Senate approved of US participation in the United Nations.  more...

Cortisol is a steroid hormone produced by the adrenal glands in response to stress, affecting blood pressure, blood sugar and the immune system. Synthetic steroid drugs are available which are similar to cortisol and these are commonly used to treat diseases such as asthma. Sometimes a hormone-producing tumor in the body, or long-term use of steroid drugs, leads to the body being exposed to too much cortisol. This results in what is known as Cushing's syndrome, where weight is gained on the face, chest and belly, and the skin becomes thin and fragile. Weak bones and muscles, tiredness and emotional changes, high blood pressure and menstrual irregularities may also occur.

Cushing's syndrome is a rare condition in which elevated cortisol levels are most often caused by taking steroid medication for a chronic, or ongoing, disease. Another cause, which is less common, is a tumor growing inside the pituitary gland inside the brain, known as a pituitary adenoma. This tumor is not cancerous, but it produces what is called adrenocorticotropic hormone, or ACTH, which acts on the adrenal glands to make them produce cortisol. When high cortisol levels result from a pituitary adenoma, the condition is known as Cushing's disease. Less often, tumors in the adrenal glands themselves, or tumors that produce ACTH in other parts of the body, can be the cause of too much cortisol.

Ad

The effects of having too much cortisol develop over time, and can vary according to the individual. It is common for the limbs to remain thin while fat collects around the torso and face, and the ankles may become swollen due to water retention. The face may take on a flushed appearance and, in women, facial hair may begin to grow. What is described as a buffalo hump is sometimes seen, with fat building up behind the neck and over the shoulders. The skin becomes easily bruised and stretch marks may develop.

Too much cortisol can lead to fatigue, aching and muscle weakness, with the shoulders, upper arm and upper leg muscles being most affected. The immune response becomes less efficient, with infections more likely to occur and spots and cuts taking longer to heal. In women, menstrual irregularities may develop or menstruation may stop completely.

High blood pressure, brittle bones and diabetes may all be associated with having too much cortisol. Cognitive problems and loss of libido may occur, with anxiety, depression and sleep problems developing or becoming worse. The treatment of Cushing's syndrome is different for each cause, but could involve stopping steroid medication, taking drugs that block the action of cortisol, or removing hormone-producing tumors using surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy. With successful treatment, the effects of having too much cortisol in the body may be reversed.

Ad

You might also Like

Recommended

Discuss this Article

bear78
Post 3

The only symptoms of too much cortisol I'm experiencing is restlessness and anxiety. It's affecting my sleep a little bit too but it's not too bad.

candyquilt
Post 2

I've gained weight around my stomach because of cortisol treatment as well. I don't think the weight is going to go away quickly though because cortisol is known for causing fat deposit around the belly. I'm sure it will take a while for the weight to go away if it does.

I have diabetes so I'm also dealing with high sugar levels due to cortisol. All cortisol treatments are not the same. I was treated with cortisol once before and that medication did cause an increase in my blood sugar. But it only lasted forty-eight hours and my sugar levels returned to normal after that. This time though, it has been two weeks and my blood sugar levels are still high. All my blood sugar readings are about 50% higher than usual.

I urge those with diabetes to be careful about too much cortisol symptoms, especially if your blood sugar readings are already a little high.

SteamLouis
Post 1

When I was on cortisol, I looked very funny. I developed a large girth which seemed to show up suddenly one morning. I did not gain weight anywhere else however. So my legs and arms remained thin but I had this huge stomach and belly. I basically looked like an egg man cartoon. It was certainly not a pleasant experience but I went through it for relief from pain and inflammation. Unfortunately cortisol medications have too many side effects but sometimes they're the only option. The only good part of this story is that the girth disappeared as quickly as it had appeared after I quit the medication.

Post your comments

Post Anonymously

Login

username
password
forgot password?

Register

username
password
confirm
email