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What Are the Different Types of Sugar-Free Brownies?

Avocados are used in some recipes for sugar-free brownies.
Bakeries may offer sugar-free brownies.
Glasses of skim milk, which can be used to make sugar-free brownies.
Chia seeds can be used to make sugar-free brownies.
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  • Written By: Lori Kilchermann
  • Edited By: Lauren Fritsky
  • Last Modified Date: 17 October 2014
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Sugar-free brownies can be made in a variety of flavors, from common chocolate to butterscotch and fudge. They can be made from a recipe at home, with a packaged mix, or prepared by a local bakery. Different types of sugar-free brownies can be created by adding dates, walnuts and pecans. Sugar-free brownies are also available at the bakery counter in larger grocery stores as well as online distributors such as The Swiss Colony's® gourmet sugar-free brownies.

Chewy carob sugar-free brownies feature a combination of brown rice syrup, date sugar and apple juice. Carob, cinnamon and vanilla provide additional flavor, as do optional crushed walnuts. Amber Lyn Chocolate's recipe for sugar-free brownies includes sugar-free dark baking chocolate, butter and artificial sweetener. They are finished off with a fudge topping made from heavy cream and a dark Amber Lyn Chocolate baking chunk. Sugar substitute is added according to the baker's taste.

Another sugar-free brownie recipe option features sprouted spelt flour, butter and extra virgin coconut oil. It is sweetened with erythritol and flavored with unsweetened chocolate squares and vanilla. Chopped raw walnuts add crunch to the brownie. After-school butterscotch brownies feature butter, a brown sugar blend made from sugar substitute, and butterscotch-flavored morsels. They also feature chopped pecans.

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Sugar-free fudgy brownies feature grapeseed oil, instant decaf coffee and unsweetened baking chocolate. Chewy chocolate vegan date brownies feature pitted medjool dates, instant decaf coffee and cocoa powder. Amaranth carob brownies include amaranth flour, arrowroot and apple juice concentrate.

Black bean and avocado sugar-free brownies are also gluten-free. In addition to avocado, they feature chia seeds, sugar substitute and unsweetened baking chocolate. They also receive their flavor from coconut oil, almonds and cooked black beans.

Duncan Hines® offers a sugar-free brownie recipe featuring unsweetened cocoa powder and artificial sweetener. Instead of frosting, the brownies are topped with a package of sugar-free chocolate pudding mixed with skim milk. The Swiss Colony® offers a variety of gourmet sugar-free brownies. Varieties include almond, pecan, walnut and fudge. Doctor's CarbRite Diet Chocolate Chip Brownie Mix features chocolate chips and butter, but do not feature artificial sweeteners. Pillsbury® offers Sugar Free Chocolate Fudge Brownie mix.

Fairytale Brownies' online offerings include Sugar-Free Morsels made with dark Callebaut Belgian chocolate, butter and eggs. The 1-Stop Sugarless Shop offers a variety of mixes for sugar-free brownies online. Their assortment of sugar-free brownies include Chocolate Fudge Brownie Mix, Classic Blondie Brownie Mix, and Brownie Mix Chocolate.

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Monika
Post 11

I've tried dairy free brownies (I believe they were also sugar-free) made out of carob. Unfortunately, they were pretty gross. So gross that I don't think I would bother with making sugar-free brownies at all.

I personally don't think it's harmful to have brownies made with sugar every so often. As long as you aren't eating ten brownies a day, every single day, I think it's fine. My motto is "all things in moderation" and I think that includes desserts!

I'd rather just eat a little it of the real thing than have several of the healthy alternative.

JessicaLynn
Post 10

@JaneAir - That's interesting. I've never heard of the Paleo diet, but I will have to check it out.

I think one thing to be cautious about if you want to make sugar free cookies or brownies is what you're going to use in place of sugar. The article had some really good suggestions. However, I would caution against a lot of the sugar substitutes out there.

I remember reading awhile ago they did some studies about sugar substitutes and a lot of them weren't that good for you. If fact, some of them might even cause cancer. So be careful of your ingredients!

JaneAir
Post 9

If you want to make a sugar-free desert, such as sugar-free brownies or sugar-free cake, I suggest checking out some Paleo recipe blogs. People who are on the Paleo diet don't eat any added sugar, dairy, grains, or processed foods. They mostly just eat meat, vegetables, and some fruit.

Anyway, I've tried a lot of Paleo recipes because I like to eat healthy and make food from fresh ingredients. The recipes are really very good. I've made Paleo recipes for a ton of people and no one even realizes they're "health food."

I've seen a few recipes for deserts like brownies and fudge bombs that I've been meaning to try.

StarJo
Post 8

I make some delicious sugar-free orange chocolate brownies. The recipe is nearly identical to the common chocolate brownie recipe used by most people, but instead of vanilla flavoring, I use orange extract, and of course, I use a sugar substitute.

The brilliant flavor of the orange extract is what defines these brownies. It disguises the fact that they do not contain real sugar, because it becomes the focal point once you bite into a brownie.

I have always loved the combination of orange and chocolate, but I fear the calories of sugar. So, I can still enjoy my favorite dessert with this sugar substitute and not miss out on flavor at all.

honeybees
Post 7

@kylee07drg - I can't imagine how black beans could replace the chocolaty taste of brownies I love! I am trying to be a lot more conscious of my food choices though, and that is one thing that I will have to cautiously try!

I have been trying to remove gluten from my diet, and that is not an easy thing to do. I found a mix in the health food store for gluten free brownies and decided to give them a try.

I was really pleased at how they tasted and couldn't tell a difference at all. I don't think they are sugar free though, and would rather have real sugar than any kind of artificial sweeteners anyway.

I think a little bit in moderation is OK once in awhile. If you have a lot of junk and sugar in your diet all the time, that is not good, but a little taste every now and then can really help satisfy my sweet tooth.

John57
Post 6

@LisaLou - I think using an artificial sweetener in place of sugar is the easiest way to make sugar free brownies.

My mom is a diabetic, and sugar free brownies for diabetics are allowed for her as long as they are in moderation.

One of the way I have tried to reduce the amount of calories when I make brownies is to use applesauce instead of a vegetable oil. I use this in the same proportion and have found it makes them very moist.

I have also used olive oil instead of vegetable oil for something a little healthier. I love any kind of nuts in my brownies. It doesn't matter if you are making them sugar free or not, you can always add nuts without worrying about increasing the sugar content.

kylee07drg
Post 5

I have a super health conscious friend who puts black beans in her brownies. She said it's a good source of fiber and a good way to make her kids eat their beans.

She only uses a sugar substitute. You won't find any cane sugar in her house. Personally, I question the wisdom in this, because pure sugar is completely natural and should be harmless to people without diabetes.

I must admit that her black bean brownies are tasty. They also contain unsweetened cocoa, so they do have a chocolate flavor.

The weird thing is that they have to be refrigerated. I've never refrigerated my regular brownies before, so this was a bit odd to me.

lighth0se33
Post 4

@wavy58 – I tried my grandmother's brownies for diabetics, and they didn't taste very good to me. However, like you said, they take some getting used to, and once you do, you actually find yourself craving them. At least, that is what my grandmother said.

She would not keep any sugary treats in the house after she found out she was diabetic. The temptation was just too great for her, and she figured that even the kids should be eating sugar-free treats, since we had diabetes in our genes.

I tried both the chocolate and butterscotch sugar-free brownies, and the butterscotch tasted a lot better. It didn't seem quite as wrong to mess with the flavor of them as it did to screw up a chocolate brownie with a sugar substitute.

LisaLou
Post 3

I have never tasted a brownie I didn't like, and I have had a lot of them! My favorite dessert is a warm brownie topped with some vanilla ice cream and a little bit of chocolate fudge drizzled over it.

One thing I have never heard of is using coffee in a brownie mix. When you bake brownies that have coffee in the mix, do you get a mild coffee flavor or does the chocolate taste cover that up?

I love chocolate creamer in my coffee, so think a brownie with a slight coffee taste would be wonderful.

I have never made sugar free brownies from scratch. Do you just use an artificial sweetener instead of sugar if you are wanting a sugar free brownie?

wavy58
Post 2

I had no idea there were so many varieties of sugar-free brownies! When I think of brownies, I envision the super sweet chocolate ones that my mother always makes. I didn't know you could do all sorts of variations.

I have seen sugar-free brownies for diabetics on the shelves in my grocery store. I've always wondered if they taste anything like the original.

I know I would be grateful for any sort of brownie I could eat if I were diabetic. Even if it didn't taste quite the same, I would get used to it after awhile, because fake sugar is better than none at all.

SarahSon
Post 1

Many of the suggestions in this article sound like they would taste pretty good. Most of the time I have tried a sugar free or fat free brownie, I have been disappointed in the taste.

I have always wondered how you can make sugar free desserts taste like the real thing. Since I love the taste of chocolate, but would like to avoid artificial sweeteners, there are some suggestions here I would like to try.

Using brown rice syrup and apple juice sounds appealing to me. I would like to try these substituting the honey in place of the date sugar.

I enjoy the taste of carob and often use carob chips in place of chocolate chips. chocolate I think the carob taste would also work well in a brownie.

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