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What are the Different Types of Pine Flooring?

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  • Written By: Nychole Price
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 20 September 2016
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Pine flooring is manufactured from the soft wood of pine trees. There are over 200 species of trees in the pine family, making the types of wood flooring available extremely varied. Pine wood is extremely soft, though, making it prone to scarring and dents. Some species of pine wood are much softer than others, leaving few types recommended for use as flooring. These types of pine flooring include long leaf heart pine, vertical grain pine, Southern yellow pine and prefinished pine.

Long leaf heart pine flooring is the most commonly purchased pine flooring because it is the most dense, leaving it less susceptible to damage. This type of flooring is very rich in gold, red and amber tones because it is mostly composed of of the heart of the tree. Long leaf heart pine is sold in 4 inch (10.16 cm), 6 inch (15.24 cm), 8 inch (20.32 cm) and 10 inch (25.40 cm) widths and 8 foot (2.43 m)and 16 foot (4.88 m) lengths. It also comes in 7/16 inch (1.11 cm) mini pine flooring.

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Vertical grain pine flooring is a type of flooring that has been cut so the growth rings are perpendicular to the wear surface. Due to the manufacturing process, vertical grain pine is substantially more expensive than other varieties. This type of floor is stronger and less susceptible to damage, making it perfect for areas which experience high amounts of foot traffic, such as in front of the door, kitchen, living room and offices. Vertical grain pine is sold in 4 inch (10.16 cm) widths.

Southern yellow pine flooring is popular due to its reasonable price and resistance to damage. This type of flooring has a wide grain, which may expose the natural knots of the pine tree, giving it a lot of character. Southern yellow pine comes in shades of reddish brown, yellow-orange or yellowish white. The planks cone in 4 (10.16 cm) and 12 inch (30.48 cm) widths.

Prefinished pine is increasing in popularity because it comes with a brilliant finish and ready for installation. It is available in Southern yellow pine, vertical grain, heart pine, and cabin heart pine. Prefinished Ssouthern yellow pine is sold in 4 (10.16 cm) and 6 inch (15.24 cm) widths with a natural or honey finish. Vertical grain pine is sold in 4 inch widths (10.16 cm) only, with a natural finish. Heart pine, and cabin heart pine, are sold in 4 (10.16 cm) and 6 inch (15.24 cm) widths, with a natural finish.

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Drentel
Post 3

Another consideration with pine wood flooring is that it is less resistant to fire than is hardwood flooring. Hopefully that never comes into play, but it is something to think about.

Laotionne
Post 2

I thought all wood floors were hardwood until recently. I like the idea of softwood flooring, and pine flooring specifically. I like the way a pine floor looks when it is freshly refinished.

I have to admit that if the prices were the same, I would choose a hardwood floor, but pine flooring is so much less expensive than the hardwoods. Another positive aspect of pine is that the trees grow quicker, so they are more easily replaced in the environment.

Sporkasia
Post 1

I have been working on a remodel of a house built in the early 1920s. Additions were added to the home around 1950, and one of the popular trends in house construction back then was the use of knotty pine.

All the walls, floors and ceilings in the added on rooms are made of knotty pine. I have no objection to knotty pine, but I think there may be too much of it in this case--but that's just my opinion.

The floors are not in the best of shape. Knotty pine is not particularly durable and the floor has seen considerable wear over the years. I have decided to replace the floor, but keep the pine theme. So

I am searching for a more durable pine flooring. The yellow pine mentioned in this article might be a good alternative.

I know that hardwood is probably more convenient in the long run, but if pine is refinished with a durable material and rugs are used on the heavily traveled areas then the floors can avoid serious damage and look good for a long time.

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