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What Are the Different Types of Low-Carb Fruits?

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  • Written By: Angela Wheeland
  • Edited By: A. Joseph
  • Last Modified Date: 20 November 2016
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Generally, men and women should consume at least 2 cups (473 ml) of fruit per day as part of a well-balanced diet to stay healthy. For individuals who are on a low-carbohydrate diet or are diabetic, differentiating between high-carb and low-carb fruits can be complicated. Although all fruits are sweetened naturally, some fruits have higher sugar content than others. Generally, dietary fiber lowers the impact of sugar, so fruits that contain high amounts of fiber will be low in carbohydrates. Among the different types of low-carb fruits are berries, apples, pears, grapefruit and peaches.

Berries, such as blueberries, blackberries, raspberries and strawberries, contain low amounts of carbohydrates and high amounts of vitamins, antioxidants and fiber. One cup (237 ml) of raw blueberries contains approximately 4 grams of dietary fiber and 15 grams of sugar. In addition, blueberries contain high amounts of vitamin C and vitamin K. One cup (237 ml) of raw strawberries contains approximately 3 grams of dietary fiber and 7 grams of sugar. Strawberries also contain more than the recommended daily value of vitamin C, which aids in a healthy immune system.

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Apples and pears are another wise choice for individuals searching for low-carb fruits. Each contains low amounts of carbohydrates and high amounts of fiber and vitamins. One cup (237 ml) of raw apples, including the peel, contains about 3 grams of dietary fiber and 13 grams of sugar. A cup (237 ml) of raw pears with the skin contains 5 grams of dietary fiber and 15 grams of sugar. The low-carb fruits also contain high amounts of vitamin C and several other vitamins and minerals, including vitamin K, copper and potassium.

Generally, citrus fruits are high in sugar, but grapefruit is one of the exceptions. Grapefruit is high in vitamins and dietary fiber and low in sugar and carbohydrates. One cup (237 ml) of raw, pink or red grapefruit provides about 3 grams of dietary fiber and 0 grams of sugar. Grapefruit contains more than the recommended daily value of vitamin C and high amounts of vitamin A, iron and calcium. To keep the carbohydrate value low, one should resist sprinkling the fruit with sugar.

Peaches and apricots are another choice for individuals who want to consume low-carb fruits. Each contains several vitamins and minerals and is high in dietary fiber. One large peach provides approximately 3 grams of dietary fiber and 15 grams of sugar, along with high amounts of vitamin C, vitamin A, potassium and copper. One cup (237 ml) of apricots contains about 3 grams of dietary fiber and 14 grams of sugar. In addition, apricots contain high amounts of vitamin A, vitamin C and potassium.

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SarahSon
Post 4

I know I am probably in the minority here, but there are a lot of fruits that I just don't care for. I run into a lot of people who don't care for vegetables, but I would rather eat vegetables than fruit.

There are also vegetables that are considered to be lower in carbohydrates than others, just like different types of fruit are. I have a hard time getting the recommended amount of fruit servings in my diet every day, whether they are high or low carbohydrate fruits.

I make sure and take a good multi-vitamin supplement to help make up for the lack of nutrition in my food. I don't worry about how many carbs are in a food supplement tablet.

julies
Post 3

Are bananas considered a low carbohydrate fruit? I thought bananas had a lot of fiber in them, but didn't see them mentioned anywhere in this article.

I have a banana for lunch about 5 days a week. This is an easy fruit to take in my lunch, and is not really very messy to eat at my desk if I don't have time to leave the office for lunch.

If I am making a choice between a piece of fruit or a bag of chips, I figure the fruit will be lower in carbohydrates than a bag of chips every time. Even if it isn't, it would be much healthier for me.

bagley79
Post 2

I never really think about whether a certain fruit is a low or high carbohydrate fruit. I figure all kinds of fresh fruit is good for you, so don't really differentiate between them.

Eating a piece of fruit is so much healthier than eating a candy bar or sweet dessert, that I don't worry about how many carbohydrates it might have.

There are a lot of fruits that I like to mix with nuts and yogurt. I know with some low carbohydrate weight loss programs, eating fruit with some other kind of food makes a difference rather than just eating it plain.

I am not very good at following any of these programs. I look at fruit as being healthy for you no matter what, and don't worry about what type of fruit it is considered to be.

sunshined
Post 1

I know when I have begun a low-carbohydrate diet, many times they don't even recommend you eat fruit during the initial stages. I always had a hard time understanding this. The fruit would be allowed a little bit later on in the program or on a maintenance program, but not in the first few weeks.

I love eating fruit, and this was always really hard for me. Many times I wouldn't make it that long without eating some kind of fruit--whether it was low in carbs or not.

Once I got to the part in the program where I was allowed to eat low-carb fruit, I felt so much better about the whole diet.

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