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What Are the Different Facilities Engineer Jobs?

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  • Written By: Terrie Brockmann
  • Edited By: Melissa Wiley
  • Last Modified Date: 07 November 2016
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There are many different types of facilities engineer jobs, though not all employers use the specific title. A person seeking a job as a facilities engineer should consider other job titles that a company may use. These types of jobs are available in all businesses, including industry and manufacturing, hotels, and recreational parks. The education level required often depends on the depth of the job offered.

Education and other job requirements vary depending on the scope of the job. Entry-level facilities engineer jobs may require only a high school diploma or similar education. Typically, a person in this position answers to a senior engineer or facility manager. The next level requires a bachelor's degree or its equivalent. The top level of these jobs generally requires a master's degree and several years of working experience in the field.

Many different types of businesses need facilities engineers. A person should consider all elements of a job before applying. For example, a facilities engineer on an offshore oil rig will need to have different skills than an engineer at an onshore oil refinery. A hotel or resort facilities engineer may need to work with the public more than a manufacturing facilities engineer.

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Various facilities engineer jobs require specialized training or skills. An engineer at a water park may need a different degree than one who works at a theme park that does not offer water rides. Other specialties include commerce buildings, food-processing plants that have refrigeration and freezer units, and energy-producing facilities.

Some common names for facilities engineer include environmental engineer, manufacturing engineer, and structural engineer. It is not unusual for a company to combine job titles. For example, a position may have the title of facilities structural engineer, facilities project engineer, or facilities mechanical engineer and have the same responsibilities. Generally by searching for a job by his or her qualifications, a person will find more job openings.

A search of listings for facilities engineer jobs reveals that several different job descriptions exist. Some companies expect a person to overlook the facilities budget and staffing, while other companies classify these jobs as administrative. In some circumstances, a facilities engineer participates in the design of a new facility, oversees the workers' construction, and ensures that all permits and codes are proper.

Usually, companies hire facilities engineers to maintain existing buildings. This often includes making sure that the facility complies with local building codes, government regulations, and other important official procedures. Regional facilities engineers, who maintain buildings in several areas, may need to research the codes and regulations in several regions to comply with the requirements at each facility.

Facilities engineer jobs exist in public or private companies. Government facilities engineers work at all levels, including local, regional, and national. Some people work as engineers at military facilities and high-security facilities, such as prisons and mints. Other businesses that require facilities engineers are religious and nonprofit groups. Many of these businesses have special requirements that job applicants need to consider when applying.

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