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What are the Christmas Blues?

Working at a homeless shelter might help defeat the Christmas blues.
Writing letters back to children as Santa might help with Christmas blues.
The holidays can be a difficult time for some people, who may experience marked sadness, depression and loneliness during a time when others feel festive.
Volunteering to play Santa Claus could help with the Christmas blues.
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  • Written By: Lauren Romano
  • Edited By: Jay Garcia
  • Last Modified Date: 25 August 2014
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While Christmas for many people means happiness and togetherness, it can also be a difficult time for others. The Christmas blues could start weeks before the holiday and for some it can continue after the celebrations are over. It is a mixture of feelings that may include sadness, depression, loneliness, a loss of self worth, and anger.

You may experience the Christmas blues if you recently lost someone close to you, if you’ve moved to an unfamiliar area or if you’ve been through another type of drastic change. They can also be brought on by everyday stresses that have accumulated, such as financial difficulties, a loved one that is sick, relationship problems or any other multitude of problems. You may feel as though you are the only person going through this, but you are not alone. Many people experience the Christmas blues every year.

The best way to start to push your way through these feelings is to talk to someone. Whether it is a friend, family member, therapist or a spiritual adviser, you can express to them what you are going through without holding everything inside. Letting your feelings out may help you to start moving forward.

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Another way that you could attempt to beat the Christmas blues is to volunteer. You could look for opportunities at a hospital, a homeless shelter, library or any other place near you that needs volunteers. The experience could not only make you feel happier, but you may even bring joy to the lives of others as well.

There’s something to be said about rest and relaxation in a new location. While it may seem counterproductive to go away alone, you may end up meeting some people and making some new friends. You may also have time to try some new, fun activities and could possibly come back with a new outlook on life.

The holiday season can be incredibly expensive if you’re not cautious. If you have the Christmas blues and believe that it may stem from your financial problems, you should be honest with yourself and others about your situation. While you may want to give your loved ones every present on their list, you may not be able to and it’s okay. Instead, you could give them an inexpensive but special present. A gift given from the heart has the potential to be incredibly meaningful.

While the Christmas blues can be agonizing, it is possible that you can get through it and enjoy the Christmas season. Concentrating on the unpleasant won’t mend what’s going on in your life. You should focus on all of the good that you’re surrounded by and keep fixated on that.

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Discuss this Article

anon360182
Post 7

It stinks. Every year it's the same crap. I just don't care for Christmas. It's a couples, kids and grandparents deal, and having a birthday near it doesn't help. It gets old every year.

anon310481
Post 6

My mother made Christmas a living hell. All my life I have dreaded the entire season. I cannot make it stop, no matter how hard I try.

My therapist said it is PTSD triggered by Christmas lights and decorations. All I can do is avoid decorations and anything else having to do with Christmas. I keep my time in the stores to a minimum. People do not understand and I cannot explain it to them. I do not have a choice. This feeling of dread washes over me and I cannot control it. I'm waiting for the New Year. If I could put myself in a coma from Thanksgiving until January 1, I would be happy.

anon305680
Post 5

For me, my family is my work family. I have no other to fall back on. They are great.

Peter Oliver
Post 3

It's sad because this is supposed to be the best time of the year. I just did a search on the subject, and up came a blues song called Christmas Blues, sung by Tom Levon. It's really nice and upbeat and it made me see things in perspective and it gave me a cozy feeling! Listen to it a couple of times, it works!

aaaCookie
Post 2

I think that the after-Christmas blues are at least becoming more accepted as a part of people's ups and downs of the year. After all, Christmas "blues" music has become more popular, as have films and television shows where not everything goes perfectly on the big day. People do seem to be moving at least a little bit away from the It's A Wonderful Life view of the holidays.

sherlock87
Post 1

I think that we all have a tendency towards the Christmas blues at times. The holiday season becomes more and more of a spectacle every year, or at least it seems so to me. Anyone who is feeling upset or run-down for even a small, seemingly simple reason might find himself or herself overwhelmed by the season if everyone else seems happy.

For me, one of the best ways to deal with the Christmas blues is just to accept that even during the holidays, people will not be happy absolutely all of the time, and be willing to deal with not being happy sometimes.

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