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What are the Best Tips for Making a Knitted Blanket?

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  • Written By: Sheri Cyprus
  • Edited By: Heather Bailey
  • Last Modified Date: 08 December 2016
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The best tips for making a knitted blanket include having mastered the stitches and/or pattern you want to use before you start the project. Knitting needle type and size are other important considerations when making knitted blankets. Also think about the yarn variety that will work best for the knitted blanket you want to make as well as how creative you want to be.

For a creative, freehand approach to knitted blankets that involves creating a mostly single piece that resembles a patchwork quilt, consider knitting one square as a starting point and adding directly to it. To be specific, after binding off the first square of what is to be your knitted blanket, instead of casting on yarn to start the second square, you insert one needle into the stitches of any of its sides. You then add the new yarn color by placing it through the first loop on the already completed square. When the second square is finished and bound off, you can place the third one on any available side of the previous two squares and so on until the blanket is the size you desire.

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A main advantage of using this type of creative knitting approach to making blankets is that you won't have to knit the squares first, then sew them all together. A disadvantage is that, since you keep adding squares right onto the knitted blanket as you go, it can become very heavy in your lap as you work. Still, the end result can be worth it as you may use up all different colors and scraps of yarn to create a one-of-a-kind blanket. For creative winter blankets, using two strands of different variegated yarns can create a heavyweight project with a wonderfully rich effect of colors.

If you'd rather knit a blanket using a commercial pattern rather than making your own, more free-form design, study the instructions carefully. Make sure that you understand all of the stitches as well as the increase and decrease techniques. If you don't, it's best to practice them on a small project first such as by making a knitted potholder or dish cloth. After that, you may want to make a baby size knitted blanket before creating a larger one.

For beginner knitted blankets, using interesting yarn colors can make even a single stitch project look attractive. Experimenting with smaller blankets in less expensive yarns such as synthetic worsted weight is advisable before tackling larger projects in more expensive materials such as wools. When choosing acrylic, economy yarns, look for shades and textures that appear tasteful rather than gaudy or cheap.

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irontoenail
Post 3

@Ana1234 - Well, you can always try again next time. Maybe try to knit a baby blanket or something small so that you can practice the pattern first. I find that if I get too ambitious when I'm learning a skill, I can burn out quickly and never finish my first few projects.

Ana1234
Post 2

@pleonasm - I wish I had heard about that method of knitting a blanket before I decided to give it a go. My grandmother taught me how to knit a long time ago and I remembered the technique but was a bit intimidated by patterns and things like that. So when I decided I would start knitting again I thought it was best to just start with a blanket. Except I thought the best way to do it would be to knit long strips and then sew them together.

It's still coming along and I don't think it will look too bad at the end, but it would have been a lot simpler if I had done it this other way.

pleonasm
Post 1

The nice thing about the square patchwork method is that it's easy to incorporate different bits of wool that you might have lying around. I find that I tend to collect a lot of half finished balls of yarn, because I'm a little experimental with the sizing of projects and don't always know how much I'm going to need.

A knitted blanket will look good even if every square is a different color, and knitting blankets is quite satisfying as well.

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