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What are the Best Tips for Breaking Sugar Addiction?

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  • Written By: Lainie Petersen
  • Edited By: Melissa Wiley
  • Last Modified Date: 20 November 2016
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Effective strategies for breaking sugar addiction include quitting sugar consumption cold turkey, avoiding sugar substitutes, and finding other, non-sugary foods to enjoy. The process of sugar abstinence usually requires planning and forethought, including the willingness to eliminate most processed foods from the diet. In some cases, individuals may need professional help in breaking this addiction and may wish to work with a licensed counselor or therapist during the process. It may also be helpful for the sugar addict to seek assistance from a dietitian who can help him or her select tasty foods that do not contribute to the kinds of health problems caused by the over-consumption of sugar.

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For many people, breaking any type of addiction requires complete abstinence from the substance on which they are dependent. Unfortunately, many foods, both natural and processed, contain some sugar, which can make total abstinence from sugar difficult if not impossible. Individuals intent on breaking this addiction should take the time to read nutrition labels on all processed foods in their home and on grocery store shelves so that they can become acquainted with the sugar levels in many of the foods they eat each day. They should also learn about the sugar content in non-processed foods, which they can do by looking for this information online or in nutritional reference books. After identifying foods that contain significant amounts of sugar, these individuals can avoid consuming these foods and remove them from their home if they already have them in their pantry.

Although some people will use sugar substitutes as a way of avoiding sugar, some experts on breaking sugar addiction believe that this can be a counterproductive practice. By consuming sugar substitutes, an addict is not taking steps toward retuning her palate toward less sweet foods. In some cases, individuals may actually eat more of a sugar-free food because they feel that they are sticking to their sugarless regimen. If the food is otherwise high in calories or carbohydrates, some of the goals of breaking sugar addiction, such as reducing body weight, may be compromised.

In cases where an individual has significant health problems, breaking sugar addiction may not be possible without outside assistance. Consulting with a nutritionist or dietitian about ways of cutting down on sugar and developing new dietary habits can be helpful for many people. Some people may also benefit from counseling or psychotherapy or participating in a support group.

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bear78
Post 3

My sister had this problem, at one point she used to have a candy bar or chocolates every couple of hours during the day. She used to try to fill her stomach with sugar instead of real food.

She went to a dietitian who gave her a strict diet full of complex carbohydrates and lots of protein. Once she started eating real food and feeling full from it, overcoming her sugar addiction was easy. She still craves sweets sometimes, but nothing comparable to how it was before.

candyquilt
Post 2

@ddljohn-- I know how you feel. I was in the same situation for a long time. I actually don't think you need to cut out sugar from your life altogether. You can have it in moderation in natural forms like fruit.

Unfortunately, I don't have many tips to share with you on how to break sugar addiction. But I would suggest you to get a glucose tolerance test. I was able to break my sugar addiction when I got a glucose tolerance test and it came back positive for type 2 diabetes. I started taking medication for it and all of my sugar cravings disappeared.

Craving sweets is actually one of the signs that there is something going on with the system, like insulin resistance. It's not normal for you body to ask for sugar all the time.

I have a feeling that diabetes, hyper- or hypo-glycemia might be the root of the problem for many people.

ddljohn
Post 1

I'm addicted to sugar. I've tried to quit eating sugar many times but have been unsuccessful. If I avoid sugar for a day, I get sugar withdrawal effects. I feel like my blood sugar is too low and I'm going to faint. I also get headaches and nausea.

My family thinks that I'm exaggerating but I really feel this way. I don't eat much of regular foods. I usually can only eat half a sandwich or a small salad for a meal. If I didn't eat any sugar, I'm sure I would be thin but I get most of my calories from sweets and I'm overweight for that reason.

Sweets are like my joy. It gives me so much satisfaction. I'm always looking forward to a slice of dessert after meals or a creamy coffee with lots of sugar. I really need help. I don't know hot to break out of this cycle.

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