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What are the Basics of Goat Breeding?

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  • Written By: Patti Kate
  • Edited By: W. Everett
  • Last Modified Date: 08 December 2016
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The fundamental aspects of goat breeding begin with using healthy animals as breeding stock. A goat breeder should be sure that both the female goat, or doe, and male goat, or buck, are good, healthy candidates for breeding. Animals should eat a good diet, be examined by a veterinarian, and be up to date on vaccinations. Also, a responsible goat breeder should be prepared to monitor the doe and maintain her good health during the five-month pregnancy.

A breeder must recognize when the doe will reach the appropriate breeding age. Generally speaking, a doe of approximately 12 months of age should be prime for breeding. She may typically go into heat in late summer or early fall. If attempting to breed a female goat at a younger age, this could result in complications in pregnancy due to an immature reproductive system and small size. Breeders generally wait until the female goat reaches the minimum weight of 70-80 pounds before attempting a successful mission of goat breeding.

During the autumn months, a doe may go into heat a few times. In warmer climates, goat breeding may occur at any time of the year. During heat, a female goat will be quite vocal, and send out signal calls to a perspective mate. The breeder may also notice the doe flicking her tail around repetitively. She may also become more aggressive or passive, depending upon the individual doe.

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Many breeders may opt to have their female goats thoroughly examined by a veterinarian before breeding season begins. In fact, experts concur this is a recommended procedure. There are many health factors that can determine a positive or negative outcome of goat breeding.

Goats that are intended to be bred need to to maintain a high protein and specially formulated diet. The veterinarian may recommend supplements if necessary. He will also confirm the goat's good health before attempting to breed. Another crucial aspect before attempting to breed pet goats is to ensure that vaccinations are up to date.

Part of responsible goat breeding includes recognizing if the doe is not a good candidate. If she is overweight or has other health issues, it might be in her best interest not to become pregnant. Conversely, if she is underweight, the goat farmer or breeder may wish to ensure the doe gains extra weight before breeding.

In goat breeding, it is essential to also consider the buck to be used for a mate. The breeder must ensure the male is completely free of any health issues, either transmittable or genetic. If obtaining the buck from an outside source, obtaining a health certificate is crucial.

Assuming the doe has become pregnant, the breeder should expect a delivery of one "kid" in approximately five months. After a period of approximately six weeks, an ultrasound can determine the status of a fetus and detect any potential problems. Monitoring the doe during the five gestational months is an essential responsibility.

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Ana1234
Post 3

@MrsPramm - I don't really think anyone who has never worked on a farm before should start out with a herd of goats. Goats are extremely difficult to manage if you aren't used to them. Goat breeders have to stay one step ahead of their charges, and that means expensive, high quality fencing and constant care.

Keeping dairy goats is very fulfilling and can be quite lucrative in the right place these days, but goats aren't as placid as sheep and cows and sheep and cows aren't even that placid.

If you think you might like to keep goats, I'd start with a little herd of three at the most and see if you can handle those before jumping into having more than that.

MrsPramm
Post 2

@umbra21 - That sounds like it would be a good plan if goats weren't the only income for the land. However, if you're hoping to bring together a good herd of milking goats for income you probably need to just start out with good genes in the first place. The average new farmer isn't going to know how to properly select animals for breeding and they aren't going to want to make a lot of costly mistakes in that area either.

umbra21
Post 1

One of the common ways of building up good goat stock and good land together is to start with animals that are used to scrubby land. They will thrive where you put them and if you use them carefully they will clear land for you by eating down all the excess weeds and shrubs. Then use high quality bucks to breed them and gradually work your way towards the herd that you want. This way you don't have to buy the highest quality goats in the first place, and you don't have to waste their qualities by putting them on rough land. Good milking goats should be put on decent grass, but that's not always going to be available to a farmer who is just starting out.

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