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What Are Teller Windows?

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  • Written By: Geri Terzo
  • Edited By: PJP Schroeder
  • Last Modified Date: 05 November 2016
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Financial institutions such as banks attempt to create the safest possible environment for employees and customers. Banks have the potential to be targets of crimes, such as robberies, and by combating that tendency with security systems and bulletproof teller windows, the chance for thievery can be reduced. Teller windows are the structures that separate bank representatives from the public. This structures may be made from fiberglass and may be used to service customers inside and outside of a bank.

The banking industry is very much aligned with customer service. In fact, the public is free to enter these financial institutions, and banking professionals typically deal courteously with customers on a face-to-face basis. Unfortunately, the very nature of a financial institution that accepts cash deposits makes these organizations targets for crime. Teller windows are a component in a bank's security system that may also include cameras and live security guards at the entrance or exit doors of the building.

There are different elements that make up the teller window structure. The glass may cover much of the space between the bank teller and the customer with only a small window for transactions to occur. Precise composition and materials used in the bulletproof glass will vary depending on the level of protection that bank personnel are expected to require.

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Also, a tray should be included in the teller window design for the transfer of documents and cash. A small opening for both parties to speak into or near makes it easier for voices to be heard through any glass partition. If the bank is located in a city where crime may be high, the opening may be omitted in preference of an intercom system to be used indoors. Sliding glass in a teller window gives employees the option to open the doors so that transactions might be completed more quickly when there is a line of customers waiting, for instance.

Banks offer certain conveniences to customers, such as drive-through capabilities. This allows customers to remain inside vehicles and still complete banking transactions, including making deposits and withdrawals. Teller windows are situated facing the area where vehicles stop to perform banking activity. Bank tellers and customers can communicate with one another using intercom systems that are often hands free, and banking deposit and withdrawal slips in addition to any cash are delivered with a drive-through teller machine. The teller windows are made from a type of see-through glass or acrylic so that customers and bank tellers can see one another throughout the transaction.

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Inaventu
Post 2

I live in a small town, where most of the banks don't have protective teller windows. There is some distance between the teller and the customer, plus security cameras and a hired security guard, but none of those bank teller windows I see on TV shows. I can see why banks in larger cities would want to install these things, though. Desperate people will try anything to get the kind of money just sitting in a teller's drawer.

I have mixed feelings about the use of teller windows, though. On the one hand, they do protect bank employees from getting attacked or shot by criminals. If I were a teller working with a lot of cash, I'd want all

the protection my employer could provide, too. But I also think that having all of that protective glass and metal may scare off potential customers who don't want to feel like they live in a high crime area. Maybe that level of security works well for 24 hour convenience stores, but people like to interact face-to-face with bank tellers.
mrwormy
Post 1

I live in a small town, where most of the banks don't have protective teller windows. There is some distance between the teller and the customer, plus security cameras and a hired security guard, but none of those bank teller windows I see on TV shows. I can see why banks in larger cities would want to install these things, though. Desperate people will try anything to get the kind of money just sitting in a teller's drawer.

I have mixed feelings about the use of teller windows, though. On the one hand, they do protect bank employees from getting attacked or shot by criminals. If I were a teller working with a lot of cash, I'd want all

the protection my employer could provide, too. But I also think that having all of that protective glass and metal may scare off potential customers who don't want to feel like they live in a high crime area. Maybe that level of security works well for 24 hour convenience stores, but people like to interact face-to-face with bank tellers.

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