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What are Some Substitutes for Eggs?

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  • Written By: Malcolm Tatum
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 28 November 2016
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Egg substitutes have made it possible for the cholesterol-conscious to still enjoy foods that contain eggs. Additionally, some egg substitutes even allow egg allergy sufferers to eat foods made with eggs. Of course, there are several different types of egg substitute products on the market today. The reason for going with a substitute rather than the real thing will affect which type of egg substitute should be chosen.

One of the main advantages of the available substitutes for eggs is that the yolk is completely missing from the mixture. This is important for those who want to lower cholesterol levels, as most of the cholesterol found in eggs is in the yolk. However, the egg white is retained for one type of substitute for eggs. In the liquid and frozen type, the egg white is combined with other ingredients to create a taste and texture that is not unlike an egg. For egg allergy sufferers, this type of egg substitute is not safe.

Typically, the frozen substitute will employ such ingredients as skim milk, tofu, yellow food coloring, artificial egg flavorings, and some form of starch. Often, the frozen substitutes for eggs work very well for scrambled eggs, cakes and pies, and as a binder in breakfast casseroles. The shelf life of frozen and liquid substitutes for eggs is considerably shorter than real eggs, but the health benefits are often well worth the difference.

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The second common form of egg substitute is the powdered egg. With no egg whites included, powdered egg substitutes have a much longer shelf life. Generally, the package does not require refrigeration, although it is a good idea to store powdered eggs a cool dry cupboard and in an air-proof container. Like their liquid counterparts, powdered egg substitutes also contain starch and artificial flavorings and colorings. Yeast extract is also added in powdered eggs, along with natural gum to provide an egg texture when the powdered mix is combined with water. Powdered substitutes for eggs work very well for scrambled eggs, omelets, and in recipes.

Both forms of egg substitutes are pasteurized, and often are available at supermarkets. Many restaurant supply stores will carry larger bags of the powdered egg mix, while supermarkets often favor smaller containers of the frozen liquid substitutes for eggs. While both alternatives are more expensive than eggs, they do make it possible for persons who cannot eat or wish to avoid the use of eggs to still enjoy all their favorite foods without worry of any type of impact on their health.

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anon151943
Post 3

Thank you anon23444. I am intolerant of both white and yellow in the egg and am looking for a substitute to bind ingredients. I want to make an oat bran pancake Dukan recipe 1 1/2 tbsp oat bran 1 1/2 tbsp non-fat fromage frais and 1 egg - cook in a skillet. What can I use to bind the bran and give a pancake texture?

anon47096
Post 2

Thank you anon23444, I have been searching for this answer everywhere. I couldn't find a safe product for my egg allergy. Thanks!

anon23444
Post 1

If, as my granddaughter has, you have a life threatening allergy to eggs, then some egg substitutes are *not* be acceptable. One can be allergic to the yellow part of the egg as well as the white part. For those with this type of allergy, the substitute must be *free* of any egg material! There are many egg free substitutes such as: Ener-G "Egg Replacer" or a mix of 1&1/2 Tablespoons each of water & oil, and then add 1 teaspoon of baking powder to the water/oil mix to equal "1 egg," or mix up a ground Flaxseed "egg." It all depends on what the item is that you are baking and what role the "egg" plays in the recipe.

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