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What Are Guinea Pig Shows?

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  • Written By: Tara Barnett
  • Edited By: O. Wallace
  • Last Modified Date: 29 October 2016
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Guinea pig shows are events in which guinea pig breeders and owners compete with one another to determine which guinea pig best meets various criteria in certain categories. Different shows involve different categories, but almost none of these categories involve the movement of the animal itself. Generally, these shows focus on the appearance of the animal due to its breeding and grooming. In this case, appearance does not necessarily relate to belonging to a specific pedigree, but rather conforming to various physical characteristics. Most guinea pig shows are fun places for cavy lovers to congregate and talk about guinea pigs, although there are some people who are very competitive.

Showing guinea pigs is usually a hobby rather than a profession, as selling bred guinea pigs is not often lucrative and prize money for winning shows is typically low. As such, these shows are often very friendly, with many hobbyists in attendance. A guinea pig does not usually need to be of a particular pedigree in order to participate, and many pigs that are primarily pets are often brought to the show. Preparation for a guinea pig show typically consists of grooming and bathing the animal, although some people attempt to alter the guinea pig's appearance with special food and treatment.

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Judging guinea pig shows is different in various areas, but it is common for participants to bring their pigs to the show in a breathable container and transfer them to judging coops after placing an identification number on the cavy's ear with surgical tape. Judges look at and handle the pigs, eliminating those that are disqualified due to the show's rules first and then evaluating the remaining pigs. The process for longhaired varieties is often slightly different, usually involving bringing the pigs up to the judges one at a time.

Many children participate in guinea pig shows as part of 4-H or other organizations. Winning these events as a child can be a positive experience, and it is thought that caring for the animal, learning the process of showing the animal, and being a good sport at all stages of the competition teaches valuable social skills. Adults who participate in the shows often have been raising guinea pigs for a long time and may have one pig or many. It is very rare for this type of show to devolve into the vicious competition sometimes seen when passionate people compete, because the entire event is typically laid back and pleasant. Often, there are supplemental events and fun activities involved, or the show may be part of a larger fair, so going to a guinea pig show can be a fun experience even if one is not participating.

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RocketLanch8
Post 2

I went to a regional guinea pig show a few years ago and enjoyed every minute of it. Unlike some other pet shows, most of the owners allowed visitors to handle their pets before the competition started. I got to pet dozens of absolutely beautiful guinea pigs of all different breeds. I personally prefer long-haired cavies, but the ones with the smooth coats are nice, too.

I had a chance to buy some high-end guinea pig food and even buy a guinea pig while I was at the show. There were also some well-built guinea pig hutches on display, but they were a little out of my price range.

Phaedrus
Post 1

I wish we could have entered our first guinea pig in one of those guinea pig shows. She was one of the most beautiful guinea pigs I'd ever seen, and I grew up around a lot of them. I wasn't aware at the time that there were such things as show guinea pigs, like pedigreed dogs or cats. Her coat was smooth as silk, and her coloring was gorgeous. She only lived for four years, though, and she never had a litter.

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