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How do I Half Double Crochet?

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  • Written By: Donna Johnson
  • Edited By: Nancy Fann-Im
  • Last Modified Date: 03 November 2016
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Crochet work may be comprised of a number of different stitches. One common crochet stitch is the half double crochet, a stitch that is taller than a single crochet, but shorter than a double crochet. To make a half double crochet stitch, yarn over, insert the crochet hook into the appropriate stitch of the previous row, yarn over and pull the hook back through the stitch. Yarn over again and draw that loop through the three other loops on the hook to complete the stitch.

Half double crochet, abbreviated hdc, is a term typically used in U.S. crochet patterns. It is also known as half treble crochet, or htr, in the U.K. and other countries. International symbol patterns denote placement of a half double crochet stitch with a symbol that resembles a capital letter T.

The first step, to yarn over the hook, is as simple as it sounds. Take the yarn coming from the skein, which is also called the working yarn, and drape it over the hook from back to front. Each yarn over counts as one yarn loop on the crochet hook. After completing this step, the hook will have two loops.

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Next, insert the hook into the desired stitch of the previous row. If the previous row is the foundation chain, place the hook through the middle of the chain stitch. On a piece with several worked rows, an oval shape will be visible across the top of the stitches in the last row. Put the hook under both sides of this oval unless the instructions say to work in the front loop or back loop only. The front loop is the side of the oval closest to you, and the back loop is the side of the oval farthest away.

With the hook inserted into the stitch, yarn over again. Draw the hook back out of the stitch to its starting position, making sure that the loop formed by the last yarn over remains on the hook. At the end of this step, there will be three loops on the crochet hook.

Yarn over a third time, after which the hook will have four yarn loops on it. Catch the final loop formed by the last yarn over in the hook and draw it through the other three loops. After this step, the half double crochet stitch is finished and there will once again be only one yarn loop on the crochet hook. Continue crocheting the project as specified by the pattern.

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LisaLou
Post 4

Once I progressed past the basic slip stitch, I found that I really enjoyed learning how to crochet. Once you learn how to complete the stitches such as half double crochet, double and triple crochet stitches, things move along so much faster.

I don't have a lot of patience when it comes to crafts, and like to know I can complete something in a matter of days or weeks instead of months.

By using stitches like the half double crochet and bulky yarn, sometimes I can complete one project in a weekend.

I also agree that watching a crochet video makes a big difference in your learning curve. It is always best if you can have someone sitting next to you showing you how it's done, but a video is the next best thing.

sunshined
Post 3

I think learning how to crochet is much easier than learning how to knit. I am much more efficient at using one crochet hook than I am with two knitting needles.

I think there is a bigger variety of items you can make with knitting, but I prefer to crochet. There are also a lot of free crochet patterns online with a wide range of projects from beginners all the way up to advanced.

When I was learning how to crochet, once I learned the slip stitch and how to single crochet, everything else came easy for me. Adding a half double crochet or a triple crochet was just a matter of knowing how many loops to pull my yarn through.

andee
Post 2

I had some very basic limited crochet knowledge that I had learned when I was a teenager. Last winter I decided I wanted to crochet myself a pair of slippers.

I bought a pattern book at the craft store, but had a hard time figuring out exactly what I needed to do. Then I started watching online videos and that made all the difference for me.

Watching someone complete a half double crochet on video, as they are explaining the process, was much easier for me to follow that just reading instructions and looking at pictures.

My slippers turned out OK, and it gave me the confidence to try some more advanced crochet projects.

John57
Post 1

When I was first learning how to crochet, I didn't think I would ever get the hang of it. I was confused by the terms single, double and triple crochet.

I am glad that my grandma was a very patient teacher and didn't give up on me. Once the light bulb came on and I realized I was basically doing the same thing over and over, it became much easier.

Now when I look at a crochet pattern, I can immediately tell if I know all the steps needed to complete the project. Once you learn the basic steps, it is just a matter of repeating them in the right order.

You can make both simple and more complicated projects with just knowing how to do a few crochet stitches.

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