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How Do I Choose the Best Tick Collar?

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  • Written By: Kathy Levine
  • Edited By: C. Wilborn
  • Last Modified Date: 11 November 2016
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In choosing the best tick collar for your pet, a number of factors should be considered. It is always a good idea to consult with your pet's veterinarian before purchasing a protective collar. You'll want to choose a collar that starts working quickly; kills fleas, ticks, and both their eggs; and works for several months. In addition, a tick collar that allows for normal exposure to water from rain or swimming is advisable. Selecting the correct size is also important, as a snug fit is necessary for effectiveness.

A tick collar can start working within 24 hours of putting it on your pet. Some collars offer protection for as long as six months. It is best to purchase one that starts working the quickest and will continue to work the longest. Even the best of collars will only work as long as stated on the box or directions.

Good collars should kill ticks and fleas as well as any eggs from either of them. It also helps to protect your pet from Lyme disease. A tick collar offers direct protection to a pet's neck and head area, common areas targeted by ticks and fleas. In addition, by continuously releasing a chemical repellent that spreads over the pet's coat, a tick collar offers protection to the entire body.

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The tick and flea collar you choose should allow a pet to have some exposure to rain or even swimming water. It should not be worn while your pet is being bathed or fully submersed in water, however. Even the best collars will be ineffective if they come in contact with water for too long.

There are tick collars specifically made for dogs and others made for cats. A collar designated for cats should only be worn by felines; a tick collar made for dogs should only be worn by canines. The chemicals used in each type of collar may be toxic to other pets. Special consideration needs to be given to puppies or kittens as well as older pets as it pertains to the use of tick collars. In addition, a vet should be consulted before a tick collar is used on a sick, weak, or pregnant pet.

Tick collars were introduced in the 1960s as a safe and effective means of protecting dogs and cats from ticks and fleas. Many experts agree a tick collar can provide the best protection possible for your pet at the best price.

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Sporkasia
Post 2

I used to use tick collars for my pets, but after hearing about and reading all the negative information about the dangers of the collars I have stopped using them. I think they work well, especially when you use them with another method of pest control like dips and powders, but I am concerned about the chemicals in them and how they affect my animals.

Also, my veterinarian says I should use the gels that you squeeze out of the tubes onto the animals' necks. I can't say for certain these are safer, but I feel better using them for now.

Laotionne
Post 1

If you have pets then you should pay close attention to the next to last paragraph of this article where it talks about the importance of being certain that you get the flea and tick collar specifically made for your type of animal.

I had a neighbor who had both cats and dogs. Her dogs were small and somehow when she removed the flea and tick collars from the animals to dip the animals she got the collars confused and she put a dog collar on one of the cats and a cat collar on one of the dogs. The dog was fine. He may not have been protected as well with the cat's collar, but he did not

get ill.

The cat, on the other hand, got very lazy, stopped eating and got generally sick. When my friend took the cat to the vet, she was told that if she had waited much longer, the cat could have died.

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