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How Do I Become a Mailroom Clerk?

Other than earning a high school diploma or its equivalent, there aren’t any ironclad requirements to become a mailroom clerk.
Mailroom clerks engage in data entry.
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  • Written By: Sheri Cyprus
  • Edited By: Heather Bailey
  • Last Modified Date: 01 September 2014
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There are many top executives who first held an entry-level mailroom clerk position before climbing the corporate ladder. Mail clerks sort, prepare and deliver mail within a company that's usually located in an office building. This job is considered the lowest level of office work; usually only a high school diploma or equivalent is needed. Most other corporate positions require at least some post-secondary education or training. If you want to become a mailroom clerk to gain work experience or to try to advance in a corporate-based career, there are several things you can do to help yourself get hired in this entry-level job.

After you've earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, prepare a professional one-page resume. Don't exaggerate your accomplishments. You won't be expected to have much or any work experience to become a mailroom clerk. Be truthful, but also promote your credentials. For instance, if you've completed classes in computer keyboarding or basic business knowledge, list the specific skills you've learned in each course.

Tell everyone you know that you are looking for an entry-level mailroom job and have the skills necessary for it. You may be surprised who could have a friend or family member working in a large corporation that may accept your resume. You may even get the name and contact information of someone in charge of hiring mailroom staff. Be confident and professionally enthusiastic when asking for an interview.

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During the interview, show a professional attitude but also a genuine interest in the position. Sell your strengths to the interviewer. If you want to become a mailroom clerk for a company, be prepared to answer any type of question by retaining your composure, but also taking time to think. If you're asked what your weakness is, think and choose something that can also be taken as a positive, but that you've overcome. For instance, you could say that you used to want to just dive into a project, but that you now plan and organize the steps while still making any necessary changes as you go.

You'll need to be well-organized if you want to become a mailroom clerk. Convey to the hiring manager the reasons why you'd be the ideal fit for the position. Being willing to learn and take direction well are other assets. Make sure you have at least two well-thought-out questions about the position in relation to the needs of the company ready for your interviewer. Follow the interview up with a note thanking the interviewer for his or her time, as well as stating that you are still extremely interested in the position.

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cyprus
Post 3

You'd have to start as an entry level mail clerk. Rather than rely on looking at job postings, prepare resumes and cover letters and approach the hiring departments of companies who hire mail clerks specifying you are looking for an entry level mail room position. Sell your skills as being motivated to learn, able to be on your feet most of the day etc.

You can also approach companies for "informational interviews" which means in your case asking a few questions about how you can get hired as an entry level mail clerk -- what are the qualifications? who does the hiring and when? Again, always sell your skills for the position and be polite while being persistent.

anon89110
Post 1

The problem with this, however, is that every single job posting I read for mailroom clerk these days has listed as a requirement, "Previous mailroom experience." How do you get mailroom experience if you can't get a position in a mailroom?

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