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How Do I Become a Little League® Coach?

A Little League coach should have knowledge of pitching, catching, hitting, and fielding, and be able to share that knowledge with the players.
A Little League Coach must be able to teach young children a basic understanding of baseball.
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  • Written By: Dan Cavallari
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 08 September 2014
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Many parents may want to become Little League® coaches when their children become old enough to begin learning the game of baseball. Most towns and cities have some sort of league already organized, so it may be simple to become a Little League® coach: simply sign up to volunteer. More competitive leagues, however, may be more selective and have more criteria that a candidate must meet in order to become a Little League® coach, but in either situation, the candidate must have at least a basic understanding of the game of baseball and a willingness to patiently teach young children to play the game.

If your goal is to become a Little League® coach, you should have a thorough understanding of your league's rules and regulations. Some training in first aid is also helpful, as well as experience with other volunteer opportunities. Many leagues require coaching candidates to register with the National Little League Association and fill out a volunteer application. This means you allow the association to conduct a background check on you. Many leagues will wait for this approval before allowing you to become a coach.

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It is not uncommon for local leagues to put on coaching seminars, and it is a good idea to attend these if they are available. They will not only prepare you for coaching the game of baseball, but they will also prepare you to work with the age group common in Little League®. As a Little League® coach, you will need to not only understand the game, but also be able to teach it; you should have specific knowledge of pitching, catching, base running, and basic strategy of the game and be able to convey this knowledge to young children of all ability levels.

The biggest key to being a Little League® coach is developing patience. The age group you will work with is not always an easy one to coach, and the children will require extra attention, repetition, and guidance. Remember, too, that you are now a role model for impressionable children, and your conduct on and off the field will be scrutinized both by the players and their parents. To become a Little League® coach, you must remember that you are more than a coach. You are a confidant, a role model, and a professional. If you are unfamiliar with the age group or with being a role model, try volunteering in another capacity before coaching.

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Animandel
Post 3

I have worked with youth baseball for several years and we try to find people who have experience coaching baseball and who have a good reputation in terms of relating to people--adults and kids.

Drentel
Post 2

Having played and coached Little League baseball, I think the organization is a positive format for kids to learn about baseball, teamwork and social interaction. Most of the kids I coach don't go beyond Little League in terms of playing baseball, so I teach them what I can, and encourage them to compete and build relationships with their teammates.

I've seen more competitive leagues where coaches are much better trained and skilled at coaching than I am. I imagine getting a coaching position in those leagues is much more difficult than having the league organizer ask whether you would mind coaching one of the teams. That's how I got started.

Sporkasia
Post 1

Many of the Little League and other youth league coaches I have seen over the years were parents who agreed to coach because their children were playing. In some instances, the coaches knew less about baseball than the players they were coaching. However, with young players I would rather the coach know more about children than baseball. Of course, extensive knowledge about both is ideal.

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