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How Can I Get My Dog to Take Medication?

It is easier to give a calm pet medication.
A veterinarian may be able to suggest ways to give a dog medication.
If the owner stays calm, that should help the dog remain calm while medication is being administered.
Some pet medications come in pill form.
Article Details
  • Written By: Mary McMahon
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 14 August 2014
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    Conjecture Corporation
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Getting a dog, or any pet, to take medication can be a challenge. Medications for dogs come in several forms including pills, liquids, suppositories, and injectables. Always discuss the medication options with your veterinarian when your pet needs to take medication, because the veterinarian may have some suggestions or be able to prescribe a medication in a different, easier to take form. Some pharmacies also offer flavored medication: you can get liquid medication which tastes good, making the process much easier.

There are different techniques to use depending on what kind of medication is being administered, but the most important thing to remember as a pet owner is that you should remain calm when giving your dog medication, and that you want the dose to end up in the pet, not on yourself, the furniture, or the ceiling. Staying calm also keeps your dog calm. If you approach it with an upbeat, relaxed attitude, you can often get it to take the medication before it even realizes what has happened. Being calm will also give it a positive association with taking medication.

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If you are giving your dog a pill, the easiest way to get it to take it is to hide it in something else. Wet food, a small piece of meat, or another treat can cover up a pill very easily, although you should check with your vet to make sure that treats are ok. The treat will conceal the pill itself along with the flavor, and is much easier to give than a plain pill. If you cannot give your dog a treat and must administer the pill plainly, you should use the method for administering liquid medication.

Getting a dog to swallow liquid medication can be a challenge. Start by securing your pet: if it is small, squat on the floor with the it in between your legs and your legs crossed so that it cannot back out. If it is larger, enlist an assistant to hold it. Draw the liquid medication up into an oral syringe in the required dosage. If you can get the dog to open its mouth, gently squirt the medication down its throat. If it resists opening its mouth, slide the syringe in behind the back teeth. Gently massage the its throat to make sure that the medication has been swallowed.

If your dog has been prescribed a suppository or injection, your veterinarian will instruct you in how to use it. In both cases, make sure to wear gloves so that your hands are clean, and follow the directions exactly so that you do not accidentally hurt your animal. With intramuscular injections, most vets will demonstrate the technique you need to use in order to give the medication safely and painlessly.

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Discuss this Article

rosequartz
Post 2

Our dog's health is important to our family. Giving a pill once a month (Comfortis for fleas) is a necessary evil.

We use the pill pockets to disguise the pill. It doesn't always work out and the pill gets spit out many times.

We rely on the trick of getting the dog to chew the yummy stuff first and when she gets to the actual taste of the pill, she will start trying to spit it out.

That's when we start feeding her little bits of sliced turkey. Eventually we get the pill down with lots of turkey. We always feel like we could have done a better job but it's not easy. She gets more resistant every month.

There has to be a better way.

indigowater
Post 1

The way I give a pill may really only work on the particular dog breed I have, I'm not sure. I have a Peke and can easily open her little mouth, place the pill as far back in her throat as possible, offering peanut butter on a separate finger to distract her.

It works great for her.

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