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Does Oatmeal Really Lower Cholesterol?

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  • Written By: Malcolm Tatum
  • Edited By: Bronwyn Harris
  • Last Modified Date: 21 September 2016
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There is a great deal of attention given today on healthy ways to lower bad cholesterol in the system. Many advertisements for cereals made with oats claim to help flush excess cholesterol from the body and thus ease the cholesterol level back into an acceptable range. The fact is that oatmeal is one of the best natural remedies for dealing with high levels of LDL or bad cholesterol.

The secret to oatmeal’s ability to lower cholesterol has to do with the fiber content of the grain. Soluble fiber, specifically beta glucan, helps to inhibit the rate of absorption of cholesterol in the intestinal tract. As a result, there is less of an opportunity for LDL cholesterol to clog the system and linger in the body for long periods of time.

While there is some difference of opinion on exactly what type of oatmeal or oat product is the most effective, there is general agreement that any food using oatmeal as an ingredient will provide some assistance in bringing cholesterol levels back into a balanced range. Rolled or steel ground oats are considered by many to be the best option. However, there is also evidence that even consuming a bowl of instant oatmeal or enjoying a cold oatmeal cereal will make a positive impact.

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Even sugared oatmeal bars that people tend to use as a breakfast food when they are on the run or for a quick snack can aid in the cause. Of course, the calorie content of these sweetened treats is higher, and the processed sugar is not a good option for people who are also watching their blood glucose levels. A better option would be to enjoy an oat cereal with slices of bananas, as this will boost the overall fiber content and enhance the removal of LDL cholesterol from the body.

One fun way to get more oat grain into the daily diet is to use flour made from ground oats rather than bleached flour products. Adding baking powder and a small amount of baking soda to the oatmeal flour will make it possible to prepare such items as pizza crusts, pie crusts, and even baked goods.

While many people choose to use commercial oat products such as Quaker&Reg; oatmeal or a similar well-known brand, others choose to utilize oat products that are devoid of any type of sweetener or preservatives. The sugar- and preservative-free oat products are usually found at health food shops and organic food markets.

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anon351157
Post 4

How about using almond milk in place of cow's milk? How about oatmeal, local honey, almond milk...?

discographer
Post 3

Oatmeal is so overrated. It's not the oatmeal that lowers cholesterol, it's the fiber. Any fiber rich food will do the same thing. So you can eat vegetables, fruits and beans and still lower cholesterol.

literally45
Post 2

@ysmina-- I'm not an expert on this subject but I think that oatmeal made with milk would still work at lowering cholesterol. Like the article said, the way that oatmeal works is that it attaches itself to cholesterol and drags it out of your system with a bowel movement.

I'm sure it would be better to make your oatmeal with non-fat or low-fat milk, but the oatmeal will still help pull cholesterol out of your body.

If you like oatmeal cookies or bars, you can also have that instead of hot oatmeal. It will work the same way.

ysmina
Post 1

I love having a bowl of hot oatmeal with honey in the mornings and it would be great if it helped lower my cholesterol but I'm wondering about milk. I always make oatmeal with milk and I know that milk can be bad for cholesterol.

So is oatmeal made with milk still effective at lowering cholesterol? Or does this only apply to oatmeal made with water?

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